GSBS Student Publications

Student Author(s)

Christopher J. Burke

GSBS Program

Neuroscience

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Neurobiology; Waddell Lab; Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Neuroscience Program

Date

8-4-2014

Document Type

Article

Medical Subject Headings

Animals; Appetitive Behavior; Avoidance Learning; Carbohydrates; *Conditioning, Classical; DEET; Drosophila melanogaster; Female; *Learning; Male; *Odors; Olfactory Perception

Disciplines

Behavioral Neurobiology | Neuroscience and Neurobiology

Abstract

Dopaminergic neurons provide value signals in mammals and insects. During Drosophila olfactory learning, distinct subsets of dopaminergic neurons appear to assign either positive or negative value to odor representations in mushroom body neurons. However, it is not known how flies evaluate substances that have mixed valence. Here we show that flies form short-lived aversive olfactory memories when trained with odors and sugars that are contaminated with the common insect repellent DEET. This DEET-aversive learning required the MB-MP1 dopaminergic neurons that are also required for shock learning. Moreover, differential conditioning with DEET versus shock suggests that formation of these distinct aversive olfactory memories relies on a common negatively reinforcing dopaminergic mechanism. Surprisingly, as time passed after training, the behavior of DEET-sugar-trained flies reversed from conditioned odor avoidance into odor approach. In addition, flies that were compromised for reward learning exhibited a more robust and longer-lived aversive-DEET memory. These data demonstrate that flies independently process the DEET and sugar components to form parallel aversive and appetitive olfactory memories, with distinct kinetics, that compete to guide learned behavior.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Curr Biol. 2014 Aug 4;24(15):1723-30. doi: 10.1016/j.cub.2014.05.078. Epub 2014 Jul 17. Link to article on publisher's site

DOI of Published Version

10.1016/j.cub.2014.05.078

Comments

This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Journal Title

Current biology : CB

PubMed ID

25042590

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

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