GSBS Student Publications

Student Author(s)

Tsung-Han S. Hsieh; Hsiuyi V. Chen

GSBS Program

Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology

Date

4-16-2015

Document Type

Article

Medical Subject Headings

Chromatin; Chromatin Assembly and Disassembly; Diamide; Gene Expression Regulation, Fungal; Genome, Fungal; Histones; Molecular Sequence Data; Saccharomyces cerevisiae; Transcription, Genetic

Disciplines

Genomics | Molecular Genetics

Abstract

Covalent histone modifications are highly conserved and play multiple roles in eukaryotic transcription regulation. Here, we mapped 26 histone modifications genome-wide in exponentially growing yeast and during a dramatic transcriptional reprogramming-the response to diamide stress. We extend prior studies showing that steady-state histone modification patterns reflect genomic processes, especially transcription, and display limited combinatorial complexity. Interestingly, during the stress response we document a modest increase in the combinatorial complexity of histone modification space, resulting from roughly 3% of all nucleosomes transiently populating rare histone modification states. Most of these rare histone states result from differences in the kinetics of histone modification that transiently uncouple highly correlated marks, with slow histone methylation changes often lagging behind the more rapid acetylation changes. Explicit analysis of modification dynamics uncovers ordered sequences of events in gene activation and repression. Together, our results provide a comprehensive view of chromatin dynamics during a massive transcriptional upheaval.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Mol Cell. 2015 Apr 16;58(2):371-86. doi: 10.1016/j.molcel.2015.02.002. Epub 2015 Mar 19. Link to article on publisher's site

DOI of Published Version

10.1016/j.molcel.2015.02.002

Comments

Open Access funded by European Research Council. Under a Creative Commons license

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Journal Title

Molecular cell

PubMed ID

25801168

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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