GSBS Student Publications

Student Author(s)

Christopher R. MacKay; Mikayla R. Thompson

GSBS Program

Immunology & Virology Program

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology

Date

10-17-2012

Document Type

Article

Medical Subject Headings

Antigens, Surface; Receptors, Cell Surface; Herpesvirus 1, Human; Toll-Like Receptor 2; Macrophage Inflammatory Proteins; Virus Replication

Disciplines

Immunology and Infectious Disease | Virology

Abstract

The CD200R1:CD200 axis is traditionally considered to limit tissue inflammation by down-regulating pro-inflammatory signaling in myeloid cells bearing the receptor. We generated CD200R1(-/-) mice and employed them to explore both the role of CD200R1 in regulating macrophage signaling via TLR2 as well as the host response to an in vivo, TLR2-dependent model, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection. CD200R1(-/-) peritoneal macrophages demonstrated a 70-75% decrease in the generation of IL-6 and CCL5 (Rantes) in response to the TLR2 agonist Pam(2)CSK(4) and to HSV-1. CD200R1(-/-) macrophages could neither up-regulate the expression of TLR2, nor assemble a functional inflammasome in response to HSV-1. CD200R1(-/-) mice were protected from HSV-1 infection and exhibited dysfunctional TLR2 signaling. Finally, both CD200R1(-/-) mice and CD200R1(-/-) fibroblasts and macrophages showed a markedly reduced ability to support HSV-1 replication. In summary, our data demonstrate an unanticipated and novel requirement for CD200R1 in "licensing" pro-inflammatory functions of TLR2 and in limiting viral replication that are supported by ex vivo and in vivo evidence.

Comments

Citation: Soberman RJ, MacKay CR, Vaine CA, Ryan GB, Cerny AM, et al. (2012) CD200R1 Supports HSV-1 Viral Replication and Licenses Pro-Inflammatory Signaling Functions of TLR2. PLoS ONE 7(10): e47740. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0047740. Link to article on publisher's website

Copyright: © Soberman et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Related Resources

Link to article in PubMed

Journal Title

PLoS One

PubMed ID

23082204

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