GSBS Student Publications

Student Author(s)

Johnna Doherty; Ozge E. Tasdemir

GSBS Program

Neuroscience

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Neurobiology; Freeman Lab; Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Neuroscience Program

Date

4-17-2009

Document Type

Article

Medical Subject Headings

Age Factors; Animals; Brain; Drosophila; Myelin Sheath; Neuroglia; Phagocytes

Disciplines

Neuroscience and Neurobiology

Abstract

The mammalian brain contains many subtypes of glia that vary in their morphologies, gene expression profiles, and functional roles; however, the functional diversity of glia in the adult Drosophila brain remains poorly defined. Here we define the diversity of glial subtypes that exist in the adult Drosophila brain, show they bear striking similarity to mammalian brain glia, and identify the major phagocytic cell type responsible for engulfing degenerating axons after acute axotomy. We find that neuropil regions contain two different populations of glia: ensheathing glia and astrocytes. Ensheathing glia enwrap major structures in the adult brain, but are not closely associated with synapses. Interestingly, we find these glia uniquely express key components of the glial phagocytic machinery (e.g., the engulfment receptor Draper, and dCed-6), respond morphologically to axon injury, and autonomously require components of the Draper signaling pathway for successful clearance of degenerating axons from the injured brain. Astrocytic glia, in contrast, do not express Draper or dCed-6, fail to respond morphologically to axon injury, and appear to play no role in clearance of degenerating axons from the brain. However, astrocytic glia are closely associated with synaptic regions in neuropil, and express excitatory amino acid transporters, which are presumably required for the clearance of excess neurotransmitters at the synaptic cleft. Together these results argue that ensheathing glia and astrocytes are preprogrammed cell types in the adult Drosophila brain, with ensheathing glia acting as phagocytes after axotomy, and astrocytes potentially modulating synapse formation and signaling.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: J Neurosci. 2009 Apr 15;29(15):4768-81. Copyright, the Society for Neuroscience. Link to article on publisher's site

DOI of Published Version

10.1523/JNEUROSCI.5951-08.2009

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Journal Title

The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience

PubMed ID

19369546

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