The Program in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology is an academic program of the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (GSBS) at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. The program offers graduate study and research focused on the development and application of computational and mathematical models to biological problems, with an emphasis on the now-available, high-throughput genomic and proteomic data. This collection showcases publications and presentations authored by students in this program.

Attention GSBS Bioinformatics and Computational Biology students: To submit your publications, go to GSBS Student Publications and click on Submit Research in the left sidebar. You’ll need to log in or create a free account. If you have the article's PubMed ID, submission is very easy. Enter the PubMed ID and information from PubMed will be used to populate the submission form. Questions? Contact Lisa Palmer.

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Publications from 2012

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Maternal immune activation alters behavior in adult offspring, with subtle changes in the cortical transcriptome and epigenome, Caroline M. Connor, Aslihan Dincer, Juerg R. Straubhaar, Janina R. Galler, Isaac B. Houston, and Schahram Akbarian

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Evolution of the Human Genome: Adaptive Changes, Jessica L. Crisci and Jeffrey D. Jensen

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Recent Progress in Polymorphism-Based Population Genetic Inference, Jessica L. Crisci, Yu-Ping Poh, Angela M. Bean, Alfred Simkin, and Jeffrey D. Jensen

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Human-specific histone methylation signatures at transcription start sites in prefrontal neurons, Hennady P. Shulha, Jessica L. Crisci, Denis Reshetov, Jogender S. Tushir, Iris Cheung, Rahul Bharadwaj, Hsin-Jung Chou, Isaac B. Houston, Cyril J. Peter, Amanda C. Mitchell, Wei-Dong Yao, Richard H. Myers, Jiang-Fan Chen, Todd M. Preuss, Evgeny I. Rogaev, Jeffrey D. Jensen, Zhiping Weng, and Schahram Akbarian

Publications from 2011

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On Characterizing Adaptive Events Unique to Modern Humans, Jessica L. Crisci, Alex Wong, Jeffrey M. Good, and Jeffrey D. Jensen

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On detecting selective sweeps using single genomes, Priyanka Sinha, Aslihan Dincer, Daniel Virgil, Guang Xu, Yu-Ping Poh, and Jeffrey D. Jensen