University of Massachusetts Medical School Faculty Publications

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine

Date

6-25-2015

Document Type

Article

Medical Subject Headings

Adolescent; Child; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Humans; Jordan; Male; Reproducibility of Results; Smoking; *Surveys and Questionnaires

Disciplines

Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms | Epidemiology | International Public Health | Substance Abuse and Addiction

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Waterpipe use among adolescents has been increasing progressively. Yet no studies were reported to assess the validity and reliability of nicotine dependence scale. The current study aims to assess the validity and reliability of an Arabic version of the modified Waterpipe Tolerance Questionnaire WTQ among school-going adolescent waterpipe users.

METHODS: In a cross-sectional study conducted in Jordan, information on waterpipe use among 333 school-going adolescents aged 11-18 years was obtained using the Arabic version of the WTQ. An exploratory factor analysis and correlation matrices were conducted to assess validity and reliability of the WTQ.

RESULTS: The WTQ had a 0.73 alpha of internal consistency indicating moderate level of reliability. The scale showed multidimensionality with items loading on two factors, namely waterpipe consumption and morning smoking.

CONCLUSION: This study report nicotine dependence level among school-going adolescents who identify themselves as waterpipe users using the WTQ.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Glob J Health Sci. 2015 Jun 25;8(2):198-208. doi: 10.5539/gjhs.v8n2p198. Link to article on publisher's site Copyright for this article is retained by the author(s), with first publication rights granted to the journal. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

26383198

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

 
 

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