University of Massachusetts Medical School Faculty Publications

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Cell and Developmental Biology

Publication Date

1-1-2014

Document Type

Article

Subjects

Amino Acid Sequence; Axoneme; Chlamydomonas reinhardtii; Conserved Sequence; Cytoplasm; Enzyme Stability; Flagella; Peptide Synthases; Plant Proteins; Protein Binding; Protein Processing, Post-Translational; Protein Transport; Sequence Homology, Amino Acid; Tubulin

Disciplines

Cell Biology | Molecular Biology

Abstract

Tubulin undergoes various posttranslational modifications, including polyglutamylation, which is catalyzed by enzymes belonging to the tubulin tyrosine ligase-like protein (TTLL) family. A previously isolated Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant, tpg1, carries a mutation in a gene encoding a homologue of mammalian TTLL9 and displays lowered motility because of decreased polyglutamylation of axonemal tubulin. Here we identify a novel tpg1-like mutant, tpg2, which carries a mutation in the gene encoding FAP234, a flagella-associated protein of unknown function. Immunoprecipitation and sucrose density gradient centrifugation experiments show that FAP234 and TTLL9 form a complex. The mutant tpg1 retains FAP234 in the cell body and flagellar matrix but lacks it in the axoneme. In contrast, tpg2 lacks both TTLL9 and FAP234 in all fractions. In fla10, a temperature-sensitive mutant deficient in intraflagellar transport (IFT), both TTLL9 and FAP234 are lost from the flagellum at nonpermissive temperatures. These and other results suggest that FAP234 functions in stabilization and IFT-dependent transport of TTLL9. Both TTLL9 and FAP234 are conserved in most ciliated organisms. We propose that they constitute a polyglutamylation complex specialized for regulation of ciliary motility.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Mol Biol Cell. 2014 Jan;25(1):107-17. doi: 10.1091/mbc.E13-07-0424. Epub 2013 Nov 6. Link to article on publisher's site

Comments

© 2014 Kubo et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Molecular biology of the cell

PubMed ID

24196831

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

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