University of Massachusetts Medical School Faculty Publications

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Quantitative Health Sciences

Publication Date

1-16-2014

Document Type

Article

Subjects

Adult; *African Americans; Alabama; *Culture; Female; Health Promotion; Humans; *Internet; *Motor Activity; Overweight

Disciplines

Community Health and Preventive Medicine | Health Information Technology | Health Services Research | Public Health | Women's Health

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Innovative approaches are needed to promote physical activity among young adult overweight and obese African American women. We sought to describe key elements that African American women desire in a culturally relevant Internet-based tool to promote physical activity among overweight and obese young adult African American women.

METHODS: A mixed-method approach combining nominal group technique and traditional focus groups was used to elicit recommendations for the development of an Internet-based physical activity promotion tool. Participants, ages 19 to 30 years, were enrolled in a major university. Nominal group technique sessions were conducted to identify themes viewed as key features for inclusion in a culturally relevant Internet-based tool. Confirmatory focus groups were conducted to verify and elicit more in-depth information on the themes.

RESULTS: Twenty-nine women participated in nominal group (n = 13) and traditional focus group sessions (n = 16). Features that emerged to be included in a culturally relevant Internet-based physical activity promotion tool were personalized website pages, diverse body images on websites and in videos, motivational stories about physical activity and women similar to themselves in size and body shape, tips on hair care maintenance during physical activity, and online social support through social media (eg, Facebook, Twitter).

CONCLUSION: Incorporating existing social media tools and motivational stories from young adult African American women in Internet-based tools may increase the feasibility, acceptability, and success of Internet-based physical activity programs in this high-risk, understudied population.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Prev Chronic Dis. 2014 Jan 16;11:130169. doi: 10.5888/pcd11.130169. Link to article on publisher's site

Comments

This publication is in the public domain per the publisher policy posted at http://www.cdc.gov/pcd/for_authors/general_information.htm.

Co-author Yendelela Cuffee was a doctoral student in the Clinical and Population Health Research Program in the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (GSBS) at UMass Medical School.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Preventing chronic disease

PubMed ID

24433625

 
 

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