University of Massachusetts Medical School Faculty Publications

Title

The PROMIS Physical Function item bank was calibrated to a standardized metric and shown to improve measurement efficiency

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Quantitative Health Sciences

Date

5-1-2014

Document Type

Article

Medical Subject Headings

Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Calibration; *Disability Evaluation; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Psychometrics; Qualitative Research; *Questionnaires; Reproducibility of Results; Young Adult

Disciplines

Clinical Epidemiology | Health Services Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To document the development and psychometric evaluation of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Physical Function (PF) item bank and static instruments.

STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: The items were evaluated using qualitative and quantitative methods. A total of 16,065 adults answered item subsets (n > 2,200/item) on the Internet, with oversampling of the chronically ill. Classical test and item response theory methods were used to evaluate 149 PROMIS PF items plus 10 Short Form-36 and 20 Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index items. A graded response model was used to estimate item parameters, which were normed to a mean of 50 (standard deviation [SD]=10) in a US general population sample.

RESULTS: The final bank consists of 124 PROMIS items covering upper, central, and lower extremity functions and instrumental activities of daily living. In simulations, a 10-item computerized adaptive test (CAT) eliminated floor and decreased ceiling effects, achieving higher measurement precision than any comparable length static tool across four SDs of the measurement range. Improved psychometric properties were transferred to the CAT's superior ability to identify differences between age and disease groups.

CONCLUSION: The item bank provides a common metric and can improve the measurement of PF by facilitating the standardization of patient-reported outcome measures and implementation of CATs for more efficient PF assessments over a larger range.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: J Clin Epidemiol. 2014 May;67(5):516-26. doi: 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2013.10.024. Link to article on publisher's site

Comments

Co-author Barbara Gandek is a doctoral student in the Clinical and Population Health Research Program in the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (GSBS) at UMass Medical School.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed