University of Massachusetts Medical School Faculty Publications

UMMS Affiliation

Center for Outcomes Research

Date

12-20-2013

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Musculoskeletal Diseases | Women's Health

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To assess patterns of anti-osteoporosis medication (AOM) use over 3 years among women at high risk of major fracture.

METHODS: The GLOW registry follows a cohort of more than 40,000 women aged > /= 55 from 615 primary care practices in 10 countries. Self-administered surveys (baseline, 12, 24, and 36 months) collected data on patient characteristics, perception of fracture risk, and AOM use. FRAX scores were calculated from the baseline surveys and women classified as high risk if their FRAX 10-year probability of major fracture was > /= 20%.

RESULTS: A total of 5774 women were classified as at high risk and had complete data over 3 years. At baseline, 2271 (39%) reported receiving AOM, 739 (13%) reported prior but not current use, and 2764 (48%) said they had never used AOM. Over 3 years, 85% of baseline non-users continued as non-users and 15% initiated AOM; among baseline users, 49% continued the same medication class, 29% stopped AOM, and 12% switched. Women who stopped AOM were less likely to self-report osteoporosis (HR 0.56, 95% CI 0.42-0.75) than women who continued AOM. Compared with non-users who did not begin treatment, women initiating AOM were more likely to report a diagnosis of osteoporosis (HR 11.3, 95% CI 8.2-15.5) or osteopenia (HR 4.1, 95% CI 2.9-5.7) and be very concerned about osteoporosis (HR 1.9, 95% CI 1.3-2.8).

CONCLUSIONS: Less than 40% of women at high risk of fracture reported taking AOM. Women who stopped AOM were less likely to believe they have osteoporosis. Women who initiated treatment appeared motivated primarily by a diagnosis of osteoporosis or osteopenia and concern about the condition.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: PLoS One. 2013 Dec 20;8(12):e82840. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0082840. Link to article on publisher's site

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Share

COinS
 
 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.