University of Massachusetts Medical School Faculty Publications

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Animal Medicine; Department of Cell Biology

Publication Date

2-4-2014

Document Type

Article

Subjects

Animals; Biopsy; Female; Genotype; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Nerve Fibers; Neurogenesis; Nociceptors; Sacrococcygeal Region; Sensory Receptor Cells; Tail

Disciplines

Animal Structures | Developmental Biology | Developmental Neuroscience | Genetics | Neurosciences

Abstract

A common method of genotyping mice is via tissue obtained from tail biopsies. However, there is no available information on the temporal development of sensory neurons in the tail and how their presence or absence might affect the age for performing tail biopsies. The goals of this study were to determine if afferent sensory neurons, and in particular nociceptive neurons, are present in the coccygeal vertebrae at or near the time of birth and if not, when they first can be visualized on or in those vertebrae. Using toluidine blue neuronal staining, transmission electron microscopy, and calcitonin-related gene peptide immunostaining, we found proximal to distal maturation of coccygeal nerve growth in the C57BL/6J mouse. Single nerve bundles were first seen on postpartum day (PPD) 0. On PPD 3 presumptive nociceptive sensory nerve fibers were seen entering the vertebral perichondrium. Neural development continued through the last time point (PPD 7) but at no time were neural fibers seen entering the body of the vertebrae. The effect of age on the development of pain perception in the neonatal mouse is discussed.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: PLoS One. 2014 Feb 4;9(2):e88158. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0088158. eCollection 2014. Link to article on publisher's site

Comments

© 2014 Silverman, Hendricks. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Journal/Book/Conference Title

PloS one

PubMed ID

24505409

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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