University of Massachusetts Medical School Faculty Publications

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Psychiatry; Systems and Psychosocial Advances Research Center; Department of Quantitative Health Sciences

Publication Date

7-5-2017

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Dietetics and Clinical Nutrition | Digestive System Diseases | Neoplasms

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Lower body mass index (BMI) and higher dietary quality reduce the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). A full understanding of how these associations vary by sex and weight is lacking.

METHODS: We used data from the National Institutes of Health - American Association of Retired Persons (NIH)-AARP) Diet and Health Study for 398 458 persons who were 50-71 years old in 1995-1996 and followed through 2006. Exposures were dietary quality as reflected by the Mediterranean Diet, the Healthy Eating Index-2010 and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension score, stratified by BMI category. The outcome was CRC diagnosis from cancer registry data. Cox regression models were adjusted for disease risk factors.

RESULTS: Over a mean duration of 123 months of follow-up, there were 6515 new diagnoses of CRC (1953 among the normal weight, 2924 among the overweight and 1638 among the obese; 4483 among men and 2032 among women). For normal weight and overweight men, we found a strong dose-response pattern for the association of increasing quintile of dietary quality with decreasing risk of CRC; this pattern was observed for obese men as well, but less consistently across the three measures of dietary quality. The findings were of smaller magnitude and less consistent for women but still suggesting associations of similar direction.

CONCLUSION: We observed that increased dietary quality was associated with lower risk of incident CRC up to 10 years later for men regardless of baseline weight category.

Keywords

diet, colorectal cancer

Rights and Permissions

© Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

DOI of Published Version

10.1136/bmjopen-2016-015619

Source

BMJ Open. 2017 Jul 5;7(6):e015619. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-015619. Link to article on publisher's site

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Journal/Book/Conference Title

BMJ open

PubMed ID

28679675

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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