University of Massachusetts Medical School Faculty Publications

Title

Sialylneolacto-N-tetraose c (LSTc)-bearing liposomal decoys capture influenza A virus

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology

Date

3-22-2013

Document Type

Article

Medical Subject Headings

Animals; Antiviral Agents; Cell Line; Cercopithecus aethiops; Dogs; Drug Evaluation, Preclinical; Epithelial Cells; Female; Hemagglutination; Humans; Influenza A virus; Influenza, Human; Liposomes; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Polysaccharides; Rous sarcoma virus; Sendai virus; Sialic Acids; Vero Cells; Virus Replication

Disciplines

Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology | Immunology and Infectious Disease

Abstract

Influenza is a severe disease in humans and animals with few effective therapies available. All strains of influenza virus are prone to developing drug resistance due to the high mutation rate in the viral genome. A therapeutic agent that targets a highly conserved region of the virus could bypass resistance and also be effective against multiple strains of influenza. Influenza uses many individually weak ligand binding interactions for a high avidity multivalent attachment to sialic acid-bearing cells. Polymerized sialic acid analogs can form multivalent interactions with influenza but are not ideal therapeutics due to solubility and toxicity issues. We used liposomes as a novel means for delivery of the glycan sialylneolacto-N-tetraose c (LSTc). LSTc-bearing decoy liposomes form multivalent, polymer-like interactions with influenza virus. Decoy liposomes competitively bind influenza virus in hemagglutination inhibition assays and inhibit infection of target cells in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition is specific for influenza virus, as inhibition of Sendai virus and respiratory syncytial virus is not observed. In contrast, monovalent LSTc does not bind influenza virus or inhibit infectivity. LSTc decoy liposomes prevent the spread of influenza virus during multiple rounds of replication in vitro and extend survival of mice challenged with a lethal dose of virus. LSTc decoy liposomes co-localize with fluorescently tagged influenza virus, whereas control liposomes do not. Considering the conservation of the hemagglutinin binding pocket and the ability of decoy liposomes to form high avidity interactions with influenza hemagglutinin, our decoy liposomes have potential as a new therapeutic agent against emerging influenza strains.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: J Biol Chem. 2013 Mar 22;288(12):8061-73. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M112.437202. Link to article on publisher's site

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed