University of Massachusetts Medical School Faculty Publications

Title

Psychiatric history, post-discharge distress, and personality characteristics among incident female cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy: A case-control study

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine

Publication Date

8-20-2016

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Cardiology | Cardiovascular Diseases | Psychiatry and Psychology | Women's Health

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The role of psychological factors in the onset of takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) is still controversial. Associations with previous psychiatric conditions are registry-based; associations with personality characteristics and psychological sequelae of TC have been largely unexplored. This case-control study sought to study pre-admission psychiatric morbidity, personality traits, and post-discharge distress in incident cases of TC.

METHODS: TC cases (Mayo clinic criteria) and acute myocardial infarction (MI) controls were recruited among women admitted to two Emergency Departments in New England. Healthy controls (HC) were recruited from a volunteers' registry. Preadmission psychiatric history (DSM-IV-TR) was abstracted from the medical record. PTSD symptoms (Impact of Events Scale); distress (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale); perceived stress (PS scale) and personality traits (optimism; hostility, type D personality) were collected via phone interview one month after discharge.

RESULTS: From March 2013 through October 2015, 107 participants (45 TC, 32 MI and 30 HC) were enrolled. The prevalence of preadmission anxiety disorders was 24.4% in TC, 9.4% in MI, and 0 in HC (p = 0.007) while that of mood disorders was similar across groups. TC had higher psychological distress, perceived stress, and PTSD symptoms post-discharge vs. MI and HC. In adjusted models, PTSD symptoms remained higher in TC vs. MI (b = 0.55, p < 0.05) and vs. HC (b = 0.92, p < 0.01). Optimism and hostility scores were similar across groups, while type D (social inhibition) scores were higher in TC and MI vs. HC.

CONCLUSIONS: Preadmission anxiety, but not depression, was associated with the occurrence of TC. High distress and PTSD symptoms post-discharge indicate that TC women may be at risk for poor psychological adjustment.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Heart Lung. 2016 Aug 20. pii: S0147-9563(16)30149-2. doi: 10.1016/j.hrtlng.2016.07.008. [Epub ahead of print] Link to article on publisher's site

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Heart and lung : the journal of critical care

PubMed ID

27553636