Program Overview

The 8th Annual University of Massachusetts and New England Area Librarian e-Science Symposium
Wednesday, April 6, 2016
University of Massachusetts Medical School
Faculty Conference Room
Worcester, Massachusetts

The theme for the 2016 University of Massachusetts and New England Area Librarian e-Science Symposium:
“Library Research Data Services: Putting Ideas into Action”

Thank you for another great symposium! Presentations and posters are now available!

Symposium Agenda and full Event Brochure

The sessions and speakers:

Keynote Speaker
Kendall Roark, Assistant Professor, Research Data Specialist, Purdue University Libraries, CLIR/DLF eResearch Faculty: "Data Work: Research Data Services in Canada & the U.S."

Breakout Sessions
  • Compliance: Margaret Henderson, Director of Research Data Services; and Hillary Miller, Scholarly Communications Outreach Librarian, Virginia Commonwealth University Libraries
  • Data Information Literacy: Jake Carlson, Research Data Services Manager, University of Michigan
  • Data Repositories: Lisa Johnston, Research Data Management/Curation Lead, Co-Director of the University Digital Conservancy, University of Minnesota
  • Informationist: Leah Honor, Library Fellow, Informationist Liaison to the Child and Adolescent Neurodevelopment Initiative, University of Massachusetts Medical School
Afternoon Panels
    Library Educators:
    • Matthew Burton, Visiting Assistant Professor and Post-Doctoral Researcher, School of Information Sciences, University of Pittsburgh
    • Jian Qin, Professor, School of Information Studies, Syracuse University
    • Rong Tang, Associate Professor, School of Library and Information Science, Simmons College
    • Library Practitioners:
    • Christopher Erdmann, Head Librarian, Wolbach Library, Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
    • Margaret Henderson, Director of Research Data Services, Virginia Commonwealth University Libraries
    • Andrea Thomer, Doctoral Student, Graduate School of Library and Information Science, University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign

The University of Massachusetts and New England Area Librarian e-Science Symposium encourages New England region libraries to collaborate and support e-science initiatives at their institutions. Featuring presentations by nationally recognized leaders in the e-Science arena, the symposium is an educational opportunity for librarians to learn about e-Science resources and current initiatives. The symposium also provides a forum where librarians can discuss new library roles for engaging research communities and supporting networked science.

e-Science Symposium sponsors:

Questions? Contact Julie Goldman at julie.goldman@umassmed.edu.

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2016
Wednesday, April 6th
8:30 AM

Agenda: 2016 University of Massachusetts and New England Area Librarian e-Science Symposium

e-Science Symposium

8:30 AM

Agenda for the 8th annual University of Massachusetts and New England Area Librarian e-Science Symposium, held Wednesday, April 6, 2016 at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA.

Event Brochure: 2016 University of Massachusetts and New England Area Librarian e-Science Symposium

e-Science Symposium

8:30 AM

Event brochure for the 8th annual University of Massachusetts and New England Area Librarian e-Science Symposium, held Wednesday, April 6, 2016, at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA. The brochure includes the symposium event schedule, speaker biographies, and additional resources.

9:15 AM

Keynote Presentation: Data Work: Research Data Services in Canada & the U.S.

Kendall Roark, Purdue University

9:15 AM

Kendall Roark, PhD, is Assistant Professor and Research Data Specialist at Purdue University. In her keynote presentation, she provides a broad perspective on the research data management services that U.S. and Canadian libraries are implementing.

10:00 AM

Breakout Session Descriptions: 2016 University of Massachusetts and New England Area Librarian e-Science Symposium

e-Science Symposium

10:00 AM

Descriptions of the Breakout Sessions held at the 8th annual University of Massachusetts and New England Area Librarian e-Science Symposium, held Wednesday, April 6, 2016 at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA. Sessions include Data Information Literacy, Compliance, Data Repositories, and Informationist.

10:30 AM

Compliance: Data Management Plans and Public Access to Data

Margaret E. Henderson, Virginia Commonwealth University
Hillary Miller, Virginia Commonwealth University

10:30 AM

Three years ago, the Office of Science and Technology Policy released the memo “Increasing Public Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research.” So far, 16 agencies have released plans. These new requirements relate to information access so librarians are well placed to help researchers and grants administrators comply. Many librarians have previous experience with NIH Public Access Policy and/or NSF data management plan requirements, so the transition to the new mandates should be easy. This breakout session will help you focus your efforts on the most important aspects of public access and data management plans when helping researchers with compliance.

Margaret Henderson is Director of Research Data Services and Hillary Miller is Scholarly Communications Outreach Librarian, Virginia Commonwealth University Libraries.

Data Information Literacy: Developing Data Information Literacy Programs

Jake Carlson, University of Michigan - Ann Arbor

10:30 AM

Researchers are under increasing pressure to manage, organize, describe and document their data in ways that enable others to discover, understand and reuse their work. However, the knowledge and skills needed to be successful in these tasks are not often a part of a student's education in college or graduate school. Librarians have an opportunity to address this gap in student's education through developing data literacy programming, but developing effective data literacy programs can seem daunting.

This session will introduce students to a model for creating data literacy programming developed as a part of the Data Information Literacy project. We will begin by reviewing the findings from interviews conducted with faculty and students at four universities. We will then walk through the DIL model step by step. Finally, participants will work through case studies to explore potential opportunities and generate possible approaches to offering data literacy programs.

Jake Carlson is Research Data Services Manager, University of Michigan.

Data Repositories: The Answer that Actually Came with a Question

Lisa Johnston, University of Minnesota - Twin Cities

10:30 AM

Data repositories: the answer that actually came with a question. Funders, journal publishers, and disciplinary societies recognize the benefits of long-term access to valuable data that could validate results, increase scholarly democracy, or possibly lead to future discoveries. With this in mind, a majority of research now being done in academia is subject to data sharing requirements that the underlying data be publicly accessible, citable, and persevered. As many subject-based data repositories help make this happen, particularly for computing-intensive disciplines with shared infrastructure, such as high-energy physics or real-time climate monitoring, who will manage the "long-tail" of smaller or multi-disciplinary research data?

Our institutional repositories (IR) could be the answer. With a few key policy decisions, and robust review and curation procedures, libraries are well-positioned to help researchers comply with mandates to share and archive their data. Whether you use Hydra, DSpace, Fedora, E-prints, or Digital Commons, this talk will outline important issues to consider as you build new capacity with existing IR infrastructure or a custom data repository, including staffing, curation procedures, and metadata and documentation requirements. Finally it will explore the results and faculty response to launching the Data Repository for the University of Minnesota in 2015, which is based on the Libraries’ existing IR service. Our data submission process, curation procedures, faculty usage, and lessons learned will be placed in context of our broader data management and curation program.

Lisa Johnston is Research Data Management/Curation Lead and Co-Director of the University Digital Conservancy, University of Minnesota.

Informationist: Informationist Breakout Session

Leah Honor, University of Massachusetts Medical School

10:30 AM

In this session Leah will discuss her experiences working on an NIH Supplement for Informationist Services grant, what was accomplished, and what she learned along the way. Within the psychiatric neuroimaging research community, data and resource sharing have become accepted as standard, but issues related to attribution and citing data in novel research are still hindering meaningful reuse. This project aimed to illustrate a system of data identification that would not only allow for proper citation of whole datasets, but maintain the chain of attribution in derived and remixed datasets, allowing for a more complete picture of research impact and author contribution.

Leah Honor is Library Fellow and Informationist Liaison to the Child and Adolescent Neurodevelopment Initiative, University of Massachusetts Medical School.

12:30 PM

Poster Session

e-Science Symposium

12:30 PM

View full text of posters presented at the 2016 University of Massachusetts and New England Area Librarian e-Science Symposium

1:30 PM

Panel 1: Future of Data Science: Library Educators

Matthew Burton, University of Pittsburgh
Jian Qin, Syracuse University
Rong Tang, Simmons College

1:30 PM

In this panel discussion on the future of data science, current library educators address the needs of librarians today and how to provide new generation librarians with the skills to become data librarians.

2:30 PM

Panel 2: Future of Data Science: Library Practitioners

Chris Erdmann, Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
Margaret E. Henderson, Virginia Commonwealth University
Andrea Thomer, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

2:30 PM

In this panel discussion on the future of data science, practicing librarians address the needs of librarians today and how to provide new generation librarians with the skills to become data librarians.