Poster Session

Start Date

6-4-2016 12:30 PM

Description

Objective: To experience the process of using principles of scientific research data management (SRDM) to work with a researcher to create a data management plan (DMP). SRDM is an area where research in the traditional sciences intersects with information science. SRDM guides researchers through all stages of the data life cycle. A DMP is a document explaining how a study will progress through the data life cycle that is increasingly required by research funders. This project was undertaken as part of a class on SRDM through the Simmons College School of Library and Information Science.

Methods: After corresponding via email with a researcher studying the cognitive and linguistic skills of deaf children with autism, a set of questions was created based on an interview instrument developed by the Digital Curation Centre and a Skype interview was conducted. Using the information gathered during the interview and in follow-up emails, as well as knowledge of SRDM principles learned in class and through independent research, a DMP (following National Science Foundation guidelines) was created. Additionally, aspects of the researcher’s study which proved challenging when creating a DMP were identified.

Results: A seven-part DMP was created. Challenging aspects were identified as a set of teaching points. These included: data being collected via video camera; children as subjects; subject IDs; repository requirements.

Conclusions: This project was successful in teaching both this author and the interviewed researcher about SRDM and DMPs. This will improve the cognitive science community’s understanding of the principles and importance of SRDM.

Keywords

scientific research data management, DMP, library and information science, autism, deaf children, cognitive science

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Apr 6th, 12:30 PM

Developing a Data Management Plan (DMP) in the Cognitive Sciences

Objective: To experience the process of using principles of scientific research data management (SRDM) to work with a researcher to create a data management plan (DMP). SRDM is an area where research in the traditional sciences intersects with information science. SRDM guides researchers through all stages of the data life cycle. A DMP is a document explaining how a study will progress through the data life cycle that is increasingly required by research funders. This project was undertaken as part of a class on SRDM through the Simmons College School of Library and Information Science.

Methods: After corresponding via email with a researcher studying the cognitive and linguistic skills of deaf children with autism, a set of questions was created based on an interview instrument developed by the Digital Curation Centre and a Skype interview was conducted. Using the information gathered during the interview and in follow-up emails, as well as knowledge of SRDM principles learned in class and through independent research, a DMP (following National Science Foundation guidelines) was created. Additionally, aspects of the researcher’s study which proved challenging when creating a DMP were identified.

Results: A seven-part DMP was created. Challenging aspects were identified as a set of teaching points. These included: data being collected via video camera; children as subjects; subject IDs; repository requirements.

Conclusions: This project was successful in teaching both this author and the interviewed researcher about SRDM and DMPs. This will improve the cognitive science community’s understanding of the principles and importance of SRDM.

 

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