Poster Session

Start Date

9-4-2014 12:45 PM

Description

With the rise of eScience, subject liaisons must become familiar with disciplinary data repositories to better serve their clientele. Research data can often be deposited in one or more repositories. For researchers who are not well informed or work in fields that have yet to develop a data repository existing lists such as DataBib, Registry of Research Data Repositories or OpenDOAR provide a combined list of up to 2000 data repositories but little information about each one. Subject liaisons at the University of Connecticut Libraries can help researchers find appropriate data repositories for data submission and discovery. However, with such a large listing, how do subject liaisons evaluate repositories in their disciplines? To support our subject liaisons better evaluate data repositories and to give them more confidence to help their faculty in eScience, we created the “Describe Your Data Repository” survey.

This survey ultimately has two aims: aid subject librarians become familiar with data repositories in their subjects and encourage their involvement in eScience; offer researchers a thorough and easily understood review of relevant data repositories. It does this by asking 37 questions in 5 sections about data and repositories, including questions about functionality and policies. It can take anywhere from one to two hours to complete depending on the clarity and completeness of information at the repository website. Our poster would like to cover the following points:

  • Conceptualization and design of this survey
  • Getting subject liaisons on board with the survey as a way of advocating for their increased roles in eScience
  • Helping subject liaisons understanding and completing the survey: tips and scheduled group work times
  • Lessons learned
  • Results of the survey and where all this information will go
  • Next steps

Keywords

Data repositories, subject liaisons, surveys

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Apr 9th, 12:45 PM

Describing Data Repositories

With the rise of eScience, subject liaisons must become familiar with disciplinary data repositories to better serve their clientele. Research data can often be deposited in one or more repositories. For researchers who are not well informed or work in fields that have yet to develop a data repository existing lists such as DataBib, Registry of Research Data Repositories or OpenDOAR provide a combined list of up to 2000 data repositories but little information about each one. Subject liaisons at the University of Connecticut Libraries can help researchers find appropriate data repositories for data submission and discovery. However, with such a large listing, how do subject liaisons evaluate repositories in their disciplines? To support our subject liaisons better evaluate data repositories and to give them more confidence to help their faculty in eScience, we created the “Describe Your Data Repository” survey.

This survey ultimately has two aims: aid subject librarians become familiar with data repositories in their subjects and encourage their involvement in eScience; offer researchers a thorough and easily understood review of relevant data repositories. It does this by asking 37 questions in 5 sections about data and repositories, including questions about functionality and policies. It can take anywhere from one to two hours to complete depending on the clarity and completeness of information at the repository website. Our poster would like to cover the following points:

  • Conceptualization and design of this survey
  • Getting subject liaisons on board with the survey as a way of advocating for their increased roles in eScience
  • Helping subject liaisons understanding and completing the survey: tips and scheduled group work times
  • Lessons learned
  • Results of the survey and where all this information will go
  • Next steps

 

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