Poster Session

Presenter Information

Limor Peer, Yale UniversityFollow

Start Date

4-4-2012 1:00 PM

End Date

4-4-2012 2:00 PM

Description

Objective: To describe the process and challenges of creating a replication data archive at the Institution for Social and Policy Studies (ISPS) at Yale University. The Archive provides open access to research data, links data to publications, and ultimately facilitates reproducibility.

Description: The ISPS Data Archive is a digital repository for research produced by scholars affiliated with ISPS, with special focus on experimental design and methods. The primary goal of the Archive is to be used for replicating research results, i.e. by using author-provided code and data. The Archive was launched in September 2010 as a pilot for Yale’s Office of Digital Assets and Infrastructure (ODAI) to find solutions relating to storage, persistent linking, long-term preservation, and integration with a developing institutional repository.

Results: Before data publication, Archive staff processes data and code files, including verifying replication, adding metadata, and converting to CSV and R. To date, the ISPS Data Archive has published over 750 files for about 45 studies.

Conclusions: The development and implementation of the ISPS Data Archive, though outside the library, raises issues familiar to librarians: the need for clear policies from the institution; the challenge of finding support for the provision of high quality services; the complexity of working in close partnership with IT; the need to keep up with fast-paced changes in technology and in user expectations; and the challenge of bringing about change in community norms and practices. Alongside these practical issues, fundamental questions arise about the appropriate role of the university vs. the disciplines when it comes to data archiving, especially in light of the need to comply with requirements from funders and journals.

Related publication:

http://www.ijdc.net/index.php/ijdc/article/view/212

Keywords

data archive, digital repository, research data, replication, reproducibility, social science research, open access

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

Share

Import Event to Google Calendar

COinS
 
Apr 4th, 1:00 PM Apr 4th, 2:00 PM

A Repository on a Mission: A Small Research Community Gets Serious about Reproducibility

Objective: To describe the process and challenges of creating a replication data archive at the Institution for Social and Policy Studies (ISPS) at Yale University. The Archive provides open access to research data, links data to publications, and ultimately facilitates reproducibility.

Description: The ISPS Data Archive is a digital repository for research produced by scholars affiliated with ISPS, with special focus on experimental design and methods. The primary goal of the Archive is to be used for replicating research results, i.e. by using author-provided code and data. The Archive was launched in September 2010 as a pilot for Yale’s Office of Digital Assets and Infrastructure (ODAI) to find solutions relating to storage, persistent linking, long-term preservation, and integration with a developing institutional repository.

Results: Before data publication, Archive staff processes data and code files, including verifying replication, adding metadata, and converting to CSV and R. To date, the ISPS Data Archive has published over 750 files for about 45 studies.

Conclusions: The development and implementation of the ISPS Data Archive, though outside the library, raises issues familiar to librarians: the need for clear policies from the institution; the challenge of finding support for the provision of high quality services; the complexity of working in close partnership with IT; the need to keep up with fast-paced changes in technology and in user expectations; and the challenge of bringing about change in community norms and practices. Alongside these practical issues, fundamental questions arise about the appropriate role of the university vs. the disciplines when it comes to data archiving, especially in light of the need to comply with requirements from funders and journals.

Related publication:

http://www.ijdc.net/index.php/ijdc/article/view/212

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.