UMMS Affiliation

Program in Molecular Medicine; UMass Metabolic Network

Date

3-14-2017

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Biochemistry | Cell Biology | Cellular and Molecular Physiology | Genetics and Genomics | Molecular Biology

Abstract

Diet plays a crucial role in shaping human health and disease. Diets promoting obesity and insulin resistance can lead to severe metabolic diseases, while calorie-restricted (CR) diets can improve health and extend lifespan. In this work, we fed mice either a chow diet (CD), a 16 week high-fat diet (HFD), or a CR diet to compare and contrast the effects of these diets on mouse liver biology. We collected transcriptomic and epigenomic datasets from these mice using RNA-Seq and DNase-Seq. We found that both CR and HFD induce extensive transcriptional changes, in some cases altering the same genes in the same direction. We used our epigenomic data to infer transcriptional regulatory proteins bound near these genes that likely influence their expression levels. In particular, we found evidence for critical roles played by PPARα and RXRα. We used ChIP-Seq to profile the binding locations for these factors in HFD and CR livers. We found extensive binding of PPARα near genes involved in glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and uncovered a role for this factor in regulating anaerobic glycolysis. Overall, we generated extensive transcriptional and epigenomic datasets from livers of mice fed these diets and uncovered new functions and gene targets for PPARα.

Rights and Permissions

Copyright © The Author(s) 2017. Citation: Sci Rep. 2017 Dec;7(1):174. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-00267-9. Epub 2017 Mar 14. Link to article on publisher's site

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Keywords

Data integration, Epigenomics, Gene expression, Gene regulation, Genome informatics

PubMed ID

28282965

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

 
 

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