Poster Session

Start Date

16-5-2017 1:45 PM

Document Type

Poster Abstract

Description

Background: Racial disparities in pain management persist across healthcare settings and likely extend into nursing homes. No studies to-date have thoroughly evaluated racial disparities in cancer pain management in this setting.

Methods: Using a cross-sectional study design, we compared reported pain and pharmacological pain management between non-Hispanic White and Black newly admitted nursing home residents with cancer (n=113,765) using the Minimum Data Set version 3.0. Pain management strategies considered included: use of scheduled analgesics, pro re nata analgesics, and non-pharmacological methods. Presence of pain was based on self-report when residents were able to, or by staff. Logistic models provided estimates of odds ratios for pain management strategies adjusted for resident factors.

Results: Among nursing home residents with cancer, nearly one-third reported pain with estimates similar in Black (32.4%) and White (32.8%) residents. Estimates of pain frequency and intensity were also similar by race. While most residents received scheduled pharmacologic pain management, Whites had greater odds of receiving it than Blacks (Whites: 72.8%, Blacks: 69.3%, adjusted odds ratio Black vs. White (aOR): 0.92; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.88-0.96). Pro re nata analgesic use was more common in Whites than Blacks (Whites: 40.1%, Blacks: 38.5%, aOR: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.75-0.81) as were non-pharmacologic approaches (Whites: 33.1%, Blacks: 25.3%, aOR: 0.70; 95 CI%: 0.67-0.73).

Conclusions: While reporting of pain was similar for Black and White nursing home residents, White residents received more frequent pain management at admission. The extent to which unequal management of pain persists in nursing homes should be further explored.

Keywords

racial disparities, cancer, cancer pain management

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

Share

COinS
 
May 16th, 1:45 PM

Black-White Disparities in Pain Management among Nursing Home Residents with Cancer

Background: Racial disparities in pain management persist across healthcare settings and likely extend into nursing homes. No studies to-date have thoroughly evaluated racial disparities in cancer pain management in this setting.

Methods: Using a cross-sectional study design, we compared reported pain and pharmacological pain management between non-Hispanic White and Black newly admitted nursing home residents with cancer (n=113,765) using the Minimum Data Set version 3.0. Pain management strategies considered included: use of scheduled analgesics, pro re nata analgesics, and non-pharmacological methods. Presence of pain was based on self-report when residents were able to, or by staff. Logistic models provided estimates of odds ratios for pain management strategies adjusted for resident factors.

Results: Among nursing home residents with cancer, nearly one-third reported pain with estimates similar in Black (32.4%) and White (32.8%) residents. Estimates of pain frequency and intensity were also similar by race. While most residents received scheduled pharmacologic pain management, Whites had greater odds of receiving it than Blacks (Whites: 72.8%, Blacks: 69.3%, adjusted odds ratio Black vs. White (aOR): 0.92; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.88-0.96). Pro re nata analgesic use was more common in Whites than Blacks (Whites: 40.1%, Blacks: 38.5%, aOR: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.75-0.81) as were non-pharmacologic approaches (Whites: 33.1%, Blacks: 25.3%, aOR: 0.70; 95 CI%: 0.67-0.73).

Conclusions: While reporting of pain was similar for Black and White nursing home residents, White residents received more frequent pain management at admission. The extent to which unequal management of pain persists in nursing homes should be further explored.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.