Poster Session

Start Date

16-5-2017 1:45 PM

Document Type

Poster Abstract

Description

As young women enter college-age, their rates of physical activity decrease while rates of psychological distress increase. Resistance training (RT) has been shown to have positive effects on the musculoskeletal system, glucose metabolism, body fat, insulin resistance, blood pressure, resting metabolic rate and psychological health. Within the types of RT, there is increased interest in functional resistance training (FRT), which uses multi-joint full-body movements; however few studies have been conducted to date examining FRT in college-aged females. Preliminary evidence indicates FRT leads to increases in fitness and may address the barriers common to traditional RT including embarrassment, enjoyment and concerns of masculinity. The purpose of this study is to compare affective responses, enjoyment, and self-efficacy between FRT and traditional resistance training (TRT) in college-age females. A randomized crossover experimental design in which each participant will experience both types of training in a random order is being conducted. Thirty-four females will be recruited to complete 2 sessions for each type of training, including a familiarization session where they will perform a 10-repetition maximum (RM) test for 8 exercises, followed by an assessment session with 2 sets of 10 repetitions for each exercise. Statistical analysis will include correlational test and paired t-tests to assess relationships between type of training and outcome variables of interest. It is hypothesized that females will experience greater enjoyment, positive affect and self-efficacy as well as decreased state anxiety in the FRT group as compared to the TRT group. Data collection is currently underway and preliminary results will be reported.

Keywords

college-age women, psychology, resistance training

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May 16th, 1:45 PM

Functional vs. Traditional Resistance Training: Affective Response and Exercise Enjoyment in College-Age Females

As young women enter college-age, their rates of physical activity decrease while rates of psychological distress increase. Resistance training (RT) has been shown to have positive effects on the musculoskeletal system, glucose metabolism, body fat, insulin resistance, blood pressure, resting metabolic rate and psychological health. Within the types of RT, there is increased interest in functional resistance training (FRT), which uses multi-joint full-body movements; however few studies have been conducted to date examining FRT in college-aged females. Preliminary evidence indicates FRT leads to increases in fitness and may address the barriers common to traditional RT including embarrassment, enjoyment and concerns of masculinity. The purpose of this study is to compare affective responses, enjoyment, and self-efficacy between FRT and traditional resistance training (TRT) in college-age females. A randomized crossover experimental design in which each participant will experience both types of training in a random order is being conducted. Thirty-four females will be recruited to complete 2 sessions for each type of training, including a familiarization session where they will perform a 10-repetition maximum (RM) test for 8 exercises, followed by an assessment session with 2 sets of 10 repetitions for each exercise. Statistical analysis will include correlational test and paired t-tests to assess relationships between type of training and outcome variables of interest. It is hypothesized that females will experience greater enjoyment, positive affect and self-efficacy as well as decreased state anxiety in the FRT group as compared to the TRT group. Data collection is currently underway and preliminary results will be reported.

 

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