Poster Session

Start Date

20-5-2016 12:30 PM

Document Type

Poster Abstract

Description

Purpose. Total hip arthroplasty (THA) effectively restores function and alleviates pain in patients with end-stage hip osteoarthritis. Pain affects mood through its effect on disability and fatigue. Few studies have examined mental health as a consequence of pain or function after THA. We assessed change in mental health 1-year post-surgery, and examined whether change in pain and function predict change in mental health.

Methods. We used data from a prospective THA registry that began in 1996 at a large public Geneva University hospital. We included surgeries performed 2010 and 2012-2014, with demographic information, body mass index (BMI), co-morbidities, baseline and 1-year post-surgery WOMAC pain and function scores, and the SF-12 mental health component score (MCS). The pain, function, and MCS scores were normalized and ranged from 0-100; increasing score indicating better outcome. We calculated descriptive statistics, and used multivariable linear regression to predict 1-year change in MCS.

Results. Of 610 participants, mean (SD) age was 68.5 (11.8) years and BMI of 26.9 (4.9), 53% were women. Mean MCS was 44.7 (11.2) at baseline and 47.5 (10.5) at 1-year post surgery; average 1-year change was 2.8 (95% CI 1.9-3.6). WOMAC pain score was 39.6 (18.3) at baseline and 83.8 (20.4) at 1-year post surgery; 1-year change was 44.2 (95% CI 42.4-46.0). Corresponding WOMAC function was 40.2 (18.8) and 78.3 (22.1); 1-year change was 38.1 (95% CIs 36.2-40.0). On average, a 10-point increase in 1-year change in pain score was associated with a 0.7 point increase in the adjusted 1-year change in MCS (95% CI 0.2-1.1). The change in function was associated with a 0.9 point increase in 1-year change in MCS (95% CI 0.5-1.4).

Conclusion. Mental health significantly improved from baseline to 1-year post-surgery. Patients whose pain and function scores improved the most had also the greatest improvement in mental health.

Keywords

total hip arthroplasty, mental health, hip replacement, pain

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

 
May 20th, 12:30 PM

Total hip arthroplasty and mental health status

Purpose. Total hip arthroplasty (THA) effectively restores function and alleviates pain in patients with end-stage hip osteoarthritis. Pain affects mood through its effect on disability and fatigue. Few studies have examined mental health as a consequence of pain or function after THA. We assessed change in mental health 1-year post-surgery, and examined whether change in pain and function predict change in mental health.

Methods. We used data from a prospective THA registry that began in 1996 at a large public Geneva University hospital. We included surgeries performed 2010 and 2012-2014, with demographic information, body mass index (BMI), co-morbidities, baseline and 1-year post-surgery WOMAC pain and function scores, and the SF-12 mental health component score (MCS). The pain, function, and MCS scores were normalized and ranged from 0-100; increasing score indicating better outcome. We calculated descriptive statistics, and used multivariable linear regression to predict 1-year change in MCS.

Results. Of 610 participants, mean (SD) age was 68.5 (11.8) years and BMI of 26.9 (4.9), 53% were women. Mean MCS was 44.7 (11.2) at baseline and 47.5 (10.5) at 1-year post surgery; average 1-year change was 2.8 (95% CI 1.9-3.6). WOMAC pain score was 39.6 (18.3) at baseline and 83.8 (20.4) at 1-year post surgery; 1-year change was 44.2 (95% CI 42.4-46.0). Corresponding WOMAC function was 40.2 (18.8) and 78.3 (22.1); 1-year change was 38.1 (95% CIs 36.2-40.0). On average, a 10-point increase in 1-year change in pain score was associated with a 0.7 point increase in the adjusted 1-year change in MCS (95% CI 0.2-1.1). The change in function was associated with a 0.9 point increase in 1-year change in MCS (95% CI 0.5-1.4).

Conclusion. Mental health significantly improved from baseline to 1-year post-surgery. Patients whose pain and function scores improved the most had also the greatest improvement in mental health.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.