Mini Symposia Presentations

Below are the full text of selected mini symposia presentations from the 2014 UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science Research Retreat.

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2014
Tuesday, May 20th
8:00 AM

Mini Symposia Program: 2014 UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science Research Retreat

UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science

8:00 AM

Mini Symposia Program for the fifth annual UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science Research Retreat, held Tuesday, May 20, 2014 at the Albert Sherman Center, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA. The program includes the Mini Symposia schedule and descriptions of each program.

11:00 AM

Advanced Nanomanufacturing for Wearable Human Performance Monitoring Sensor Platforms

Jeffrey Morse, University of Massachusetts - Amherst

11:00 AM

As part of the mini-symposium entitled "Creating Devices for Personalized Health Monitoring," Dr. Morse discusses advances in transitioning nanofabrication processes for realizing sensors for personalized health monitoring, including the development of wearable microfluidic sensors for detection of biomarkers indicative of stress and fatigue. Examples from current projects include nanoparticle field effect transistor (FET) sensors, printed microfluidics, and replication of antimicrobial/anti-fouling surfaces via high throughput, roll-to-roll processes.

Creating Devices for Personal Health Monitoring

D. Joseph Jerry, University of Massachusetts - Amherst

11:00 AM

As part of the mini-symposium entitled "Creating Devices for Personalized Health Monitoring," Dr. Jerry introduces the symposium with a presentation about the Center for Personalized Health Monitoring (CPHM). The CPHM is an interdisciplinary research, training, and technology development center in wearable sensor systems for personalized health and biometric monitoring. CPHM’s mission is to conduct basic and translational research with world-leading impact across the entire technical roadmap for advanced personalized health monitoring for acute care and tele-medicine settings.

Creating Devices for Personalized Health Monitoring: Cardiovascular Monitoring Case Studies

David D. McManus, University of Massachusetts Medical School

11:00 AM

As part of the mini-symposium entitled "Creating Devices for Personalized Health Monitoring," Dr. McManus presents recent work related to cardiac monitoring using smartphone and bioimpedance sensors, including arrhythmia, blood volume, and heart failure monitoring.

Emotion Regulation through Meditation

Judson Brewer, University of Massachusetts Medical School

11:00 AM

As part of the mini-symposium entitled "Can Simply Paying Attention Change Behavior? Emotion and Behavior Regulation through Meditation," Dr. Brewer briefly presents studies that used conventional and real-time fMRI to investigate the neurobiological mechanisms of mindfulness comparing novice and experienced meditators.

Predicting Key Healthcare Outcomes

Arlene S. Ash, University of Massachusetts Medical School

11:00 AM

As part of the mini-symposium entitled "Finding Signals Amidst the Noise," this presentation discusses how risk adjustment makes health care data more informative and enables useful comparisons.

Validating and Testing Wearable Sensors to Assess Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in the Center for Personalized Health Monitoring

Patty Freedson, University of Massachusetts Amherst

11:00 AM

As part of the mini-symposium entitled "Creating Devices for Personalized Health Monitoring," Dr. Freedson highlights her group’s research on the calibration and validation of wearable physical activity sensors and how these sensors are used to examine the relationship between physical activity dose and health-related responses. She also discusses research pertaining to sleep monitoring sensors conducted by Dr. Rebecca Spencer in the Department of Psychology.

2:30 PM

Assessing Sedentary Behavior and Physical Activity with Wearable Sensors

Patty Freedson, University of Massachusetts Amherst

2:30 PM

As part of the mini-symposium entitled "Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior and Function in Individuals with Knee and Hip Osteoarthritis: Clinical Observations and Opportunities for Future Research," Dr. Freedson highlights her group's research on using wearable monitors to objectively quantify changes in physical activity and sedentary behavior in individuals with moderate to severe knee and/or hip osteoarthritis.

Data Acquisition, Data Management and Subject Tracking in an RCT: Promoting Breast Cancer Screening in Non-Adherent Women

Roger S. Luckmann, University of Massachusetts Medical School

2:30 PM

As part of the mini-symposium entitled "Data Acquisition, Data Management, and Subject Tracking in Clinical and Translational Research: Seeking Solutions to Persistent Challenges," Dr. Luckmann's presentation focuses on common challenges arising from his clinical research experience in the development and implementation of complex data systems for clinical studies.

Data Acquisition, Management and Tracking

Bruce A. Barton, University of Massachusetts Medical School
Mary E. Costanza, University of Massachusetts Medical School

2:30 PM

As part of the mini-symposium entitled "Data Acquisition, Data Management, and Subject Tracking in Clinical and Translational Research: Seeking Solutions to Persistent Challenges," Drs. Barton and Costanza introduce the symposium with a presentation explaining the importance of data acquisition, management, and tracking of clinical research data.

Optimizing the Exercise Drug to Oppose Glucose Intolerance/T2D

Barry Braun, University of Massachusetts Amherst

2:30 PM

As part of the mini-symposium entitled "Divergent Impacts of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior on Glucose Intolerance and Vascular Function: From Laboratory to Clinic," this presentation shares data on the role of increased physical activity and sedentary behavior in mediating Type 2 diabetes.

Physical Activity, Inactivity and Sedentary Behavior: Mediators of Vascular Health

Sarah Witkowski, University of Massachusetts Amherst

2:30 PM

As part of the mini-symposium entitled "Divergent Impacts of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior on Glucose Intolerance and Vascular Function: From Laboratory to Clinic," this presentation shares data on the role of increased physical activity and sedentary behavior in mediating cardiovascular disease.

Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior, and Gestational Diabetes

Lisa Chasan-Taber, University of Massachusetts Amherst

2:30 PM

As part of the mini-symposium entitled "Divergent Impacts of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior on Glucose Intolerance and Vascular Function: From Laboratory to Clinic," this presentation shares data on the role of increased physical activity and sedentary behavior in mediating gestational diabetes.

Understanding and Addressing the Legal Needs of Refugees

Heather-Lyn Haley, University of Massachusetts Medical School
Valerie Zolezzi-Wyndham, Community Legal Aid

2:30 PM

As part of the mini-symposium entitled "Utilizing Community Voices to Translate Research into Communities: Results from Three Pilot Studies Conducted by Academic and Community Partnerships," this presentation discusses a study that focuses on understanding the barriers refugees face when obtaining critical support services, benefits and housing. The aim is to improve individual and systemic level advocacy and training strategies designed to reduce the barriers impeding access to public benefits and housing for Worcester’s growing and diverse refugee population.

4:00 PM

Improving Balance and Mobility in People with Multiple Sclerosis

Richard van Emmerik, University of Massachusetts Amherst

4:00 PM

Impaired balance and gait function are highly prevalent and associated with reduced quality of life in those with Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Recent evidence implicates the somatosensory system as a major contributor to balance dysfunction in this population. As part of the mini-symposium entitled "Advanced Computational and Technological Approaches to Mitigating Mobility Dysfunction in People with Multiple Sclerosis," this presentation will review current intervention and rehabilitation methods aimed at improving balance and mobility in people with MS. Particular focus will be on the effects of Tai Chi training, which integrates coordination, strength and flexibility in enhancing adaptive postural control and physical function.

Manipulating the Gut Microbiome for Human Health

Beth A. McCormick, University of Massachusetts Medical School
Jeffrey Blanchard, University of Massachusetts Amherst

4:00 PM

Mounting evidence suggests that particular aspects of human health and disease may be attributable to the trillions of microbes that inhabit our gastrointestinal tract, collectively referred to as the gut microbiota. As part of the mini-symposium entitled "Manipulating the Gut Microbiome for Human Health," Drs. McCormick and Blanchard introduce the symposium, which will offer session lectures and a follow-up interactive, discussion-based workshop on topics related to attempts to manipulate the gut microbiota to improve health.

Re-establishing the Balance of Nature in C. Diff with Fecal Microbiota Transplant

Randall Pellish, University of Massachusetts Medical School

4:00 PM

Mounting evidence suggests that particular aspects of human health and disease may be attributable to the trillions of microbes that inhabit our gastrointestinal tract, collectively referred to as the gut microbiota. Evidence suggests that pathologic changes to the microbiota (termed “dysbiosis”) are associated with a wide variety of medical outcomes, and therefore therapeutic manipulation of the microbiota is a major area of research interest. As part of the mini-symposium entitled "Manipulating the Gut Microbiome for Human Health," Dr. Pellish presents recent work related to fecal microbiota transplantation as a potentail treatment for Clostridium difficile colitis.

Somatosensory Impairment and Balance Dysfunction in Multiple Sclerosis

Stephanie Jones, University of Massachusetts Amherst

4:00 PM

Impaired balance and gait function are highly prevalent and associated with reduced quality of life in those with Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Recent evidence implicates the somatosensory system as a major contributor to balance dysfunction in this population. As part of the mini-symposium entitled "Advanced Computational and Technological Approaches to Mitigating Mobility Dysfunction in People with Multiple Sclerosis," this presentation will discuss evidence supporting the role of reduced somatosensation in balance for those with MS and introduce a new paradigm to assess sensation during functional postures in the clinical and laboratory settings.

Systems Science and Health: Using Analytical Approaches to Evaluate Healthcare Policy Decisions

Isa Bar-On, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
Allison B. Rosen, University of Massachusetts Medical School
Tze Chiam, University of Massachusetts Medical School
Renata Konrad, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
Oleg Pavlov, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
Khalid Saeed, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
Shamsnaz Virani, Worcester Polytechnic Institute

4:00 PM

This collection of presentations is from the mini-symposium entitled "Systems Science and Health: Using Analytical Approaches to Evaluate Healthcare Policy Decisions." The focus of this symposium is on systems science applications to health research. Systems science is a collection of analytical computer simulation techniques which are used to evaluate optimize and improve healthcare delivery processes. These techniques account for the complexity of the healthcare system and healthcare processes by modeling nonlinear relationships between variables, the feedback effects, delays and soft variables. The analysis stresses heterogeneity of agents, resistance to change, potential unintended consequences, and behavioral emergence in complex systems. Such models use historical data to simulate the operations of healthcare systems providing an approximation of future outcomes. The presenters will discuss several different types of simulations methods, highlight recent advances, and describe funding opportunities from the National Institutes of Health. Examples from chronic disease patient chains, physician incentive redesign, clinic staffing and Emergency Department redesign will be discussed.

The Guts and Bolts of the Diet and a Look into the Microbiome

Barbara C. Olendzki, University of Massachusetts Medical School

4:00 PM

Mounting evidence suggests that particular aspects of human health and disease may be attributable to the trillions of microbes that inhabit our gastrointestinal tract, collectively referred to as the gut microbiota. Evidence suggests that pathologic changes to the microbiota (termed “dysbiosis”) are associated with a wide variety of medical outcomes, and therefore therapeutic manipulation of the microbiota is a major area of research interest. As part of the mini-symposium entitled "Manipulating the Gut Microbiome for Human Health," Dr. Olendzki presents on the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Anti-Inflammatory Diet (IBD-AID).