Poster Presentations

Start Date

20-5-2014 12:30 PM

Description

While massively parallel sequencing of whole genomes shed light on many previously puzzling genetic questions, the high costs associated with this approach makes its use impractical when large cohorts need to be sequenced at high coverage. Available capture technologies reduces the sequencing costs by enriching template material for the regions of interest. However, these technologies are also prohibitively costly at high sample numbers. Capture methods utilizing molecular inversion probes (MIPs) offer a flexible alternative to enrich template material that multiplex well for thousands of samples and require minimal resources. Here, for our work in malaria, we extend the utility of MIPs, improving the capture length and efficiency. We have also dramatically decreased the capture time from 24-48 h to 1 h. Combined, these improvements allow the potential for rapid and reliable application of MIP captures in research and, importantly, clinical settings.

Comments

Abstract of poster presented at the 2014 UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science Research Retreat, held on May 20, 2014 at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Mass.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

 
May 20th, 12:30 PM

Utilization of Molecular Inversion Probes in Malaria Sequencing

While massively parallel sequencing of whole genomes shed light on many previously puzzling genetic questions, the high costs associated with this approach makes its use impractical when large cohorts need to be sequenced at high coverage. Available capture technologies reduces the sequencing costs by enriching template material for the regions of interest. However, these technologies are also prohibitively costly at high sample numbers. Capture methods utilizing molecular inversion probes (MIPs) offer a flexible alternative to enrich template material that multiplex well for thousands of samples and require minimal resources. Here, for our work in malaria, we extend the utility of MIPs, improving the capture length and efficiency. We have also dramatically decreased the capture time from 24-48 h to 1 h. Combined, these improvements allow the potential for rapid and reliable application of MIP captures in research and, importantly, clinical settings.

 

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