Poster Presentations

Start Date

20-5-2014 12:30 PM

Description

Background: Readmissions following acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are costly and may be partly due to poor care. A previous systematic review examined the literature through 2007. Since then, health policy has changed and additional articles examining predictors of readmission have appeared. We sought to conduct a systematic review of the literature after 2007 regarding socio-demographic, clinical, psychosocial, and hospital level predictors of 30-day readmissions after acute coronary syndrome.

Methods: A systematic search of the literature using Pubmed, OVID, ISI web of science, CINAHL, ACP and the Cochrane Library was conducted, including a quality assessment using Downs and Black criteria. Articles reporting on 30-day readmission rate and examining at least one patient-level predictor of readmission at 30 days were included; articles examining interventions to reduce readmissions were excluded.

Results: Twenty-two studies were included in this review from which more than 60 predictors of 30-day readmission were identified. Age, co-morbidity, COPD, diabetes, hypertension and having had a previous AMI were all consistently associated with higher risk of readmission. However, no studies reported psychosocial factors as predictors of readmission at 30 days.

Conclusion: Studies of readmission should adjust for age and co-morbidity, consistent predictors of readmission at 30-days. Patients with these risk factors for readmission should be targeted for more-intensive follow-up after discharge. Psychosocial predictors of readmission remains a relatively unexplored area of research.

Comments

Abstract of poster presented at the 2014 UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science Research Retreat, held on May 20, 2014 at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Mass.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

 
May 20th, 12:30 PM

Patient- and Hospital-level Predictors of 30-day Readmission after Acute Coronary Syndrome: A Systematic Review

Background: Readmissions following acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are costly and may be partly due to poor care. A previous systematic review examined the literature through 2007. Since then, health policy has changed and additional articles examining predictors of readmission have appeared. We sought to conduct a systematic review of the literature after 2007 regarding socio-demographic, clinical, psychosocial, and hospital level predictors of 30-day readmissions after acute coronary syndrome.

Methods: A systematic search of the literature using Pubmed, OVID, ISI web of science, CINAHL, ACP and the Cochrane Library was conducted, including a quality assessment using Downs and Black criteria. Articles reporting on 30-day readmission rate and examining at least one patient-level predictor of readmission at 30 days were included; articles examining interventions to reduce readmissions were excluded.

Results: Twenty-two studies were included in this review from which more than 60 predictors of 30-day readmission were identified. Age, co-morbidity, COPD, diabetes, hypertension and having had a previous AMI were all consistently associated with higher risk of readmission. However, no studies reported psychosocial factors as predictors of readmission at 30 days.

Conclusion: Studies of readmission should adjust for age and co-morbidity, consistent predictors of readmission at 30-days. Patients with these risk factors for readmission should be targeted for more-intensive follow-up after discharge. Psychosocial predictors of readmission remains a relatively unexplored area of research.

 

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