Poster Presentations

Start Date

20-5-2014 12:30 PM

Description

Objective: To estimate the extent to which long-term use of prescription non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) relieve symptoms and delay disease progression among patients with radiographically confirmed osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee.

Methods: Using Osteoarthritis Initiative data, we identified participants with confirmed OA at enrollment and evaluated changes in symptoms measured using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index, WOMAC (n=1,846) and joint space width measured using serial x-rays and a customized software tool (n=1,116) over 4 years. Covariates included sociodemographics, OA clinical characteristics, indices of general health status, body mass index, and use of other treatments. We adjusted for baseline and time-varying confounders using marginal structural modeling.

Results: Six percent initiated NSAID treatment at year one, with half of the initiators being regular users. After adjusting for time-varying confounders with marginal structural models, we found that compared to participants who never reported use of prescription NSAIDs, those reporting use for 3 years had on average 0.88 point decrease (95% Confidence Interval (CI): -0.46 to 2.22) in WOMAC Pain, 0.72 point decrease (95% CI: -0.12 to 1.56) in WOMAC Stiffness, 4.27 points decrease (95% CI: 0.31 to -8.84) in WOMAC Function, and 0.28mm increase (95% CI: -0.06 to 0.62) in joint space width.

Conclusions: Long term NSAID use was associated with a priori defined minimally important clinical improvements in stiffness, function and structural degeneration, but not in pain.

Comments

Abstract of poster presented at the 2014 UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science Research Retreat, held on May 20, 2014 at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Mass.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

 
May 20th, 12:30 PM

Long-term Effects of Use of Prescription Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Agents on Symptoms and Disease Progression among Patients with Radiographically Confirmed Osteoarthritis of the Knee

Objective: To estimate the extent to which long-term use of prescription non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) relieve symptoms and delay disease progression among patients with radiographically confirmed osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee.

Methods: Using Osteoarthritis Initiative data, we identified participants with confirmed OA at enrollment and evaluated changes in symptoms measured using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index, WOMAC (n=1,846) and joint space width measured using serial x-rays and a customized software tool (n=1,116) over 4 years. Covariates included sociodemographics, OA clinical characteristics, indices of general health status, body mass index, and use of other treatments. We adjusted for baseline and time-varying confounders using marginal structural modeling.

Results: Six percent initiated NSAID treatment at year one, with half of the initiators being regular users. After adjusting for time-varying confounders with marginal structural models, we found that compared to participants who never reported use of prescription NSAIDs, those reporting use for 3 years had on average 0.88 point decrease (95% Confidence Interval (CI): -0.46 to 2.22) in WOMAC Pain, 0.72 point decrease (95% CI: -0.12 to 1.56) in WOMAC Stiffness, 4.27 points decrease (95% CI: 0.31 to -8.84) in WOMAC Function, and 0.28mm increase (95% CI: -0.06 to 0.62) in joint space width.

Conclusions: Long term NSAID use was associated with a priori defined minimally important clinical improvements in stiffness, function and structural degeneration, but not in pain.

 

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