Poster Presentations

Start Date

20-5-2014 12:30 PM

Description

Introduction: Dantrolene is neuroprotective in animal models and may attenuate cerebral vasospasm (cVSP) after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) in humans. We evaluated safety/tolerability and feasibility of intravenous dantrolene (IV-D) after aSAH.

Methods: In this single-center, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial, 31 patients with acute aSAH were randomized to IV-D 1.25 mg IV every 6 hours x 7 days (n=16) or placebo (n=15). Primary endpoint was incidence of hyponatremia (sNa ≤ 134 mmol/L) and liver toxicity (% patients with ALT, AST and AlkPhos >5x upper limit of normal). Secondary safety endpoints included tolerability, systemic hypotension and intracranial hypertension. Efficacy was explored by clinical, transcranial Doppler (TCD) or angiographic cVSP occurrence, delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and 3-month modified-Rankin-Scale, Glasgow Outcome Scale and Barthel Index. Statistical analysis was performed using non-parametric tests, generalized estimating equations and mixed models.

Results: Between IV-D vs. placebo, no differences were observed in the primary outcome (hyponatremia: 44% vs. 67% [p=0.29]; liver toxicity 6% vs. 0% [p=1.0]). Numerically more AEs and SAEs were seen in the IV-D group, but did not reach statistical significance (16 vs. 5 AEs, of which 5 vs. 2 were severe; RR 2.2; 95% CI 0.7-6.7; p=0.16). Three IV-D vs. two placebo patients reached stop criteria: one IV-D patient developed liver toxicity; two patients in each group developed brain edema requiring osmotherapy. No differences in angiographic, TCD, clinical cVSP, DCI, or 3-month functional outcomes were seen. Quantitative angiogram analysis revealed a trend towards increased vessel diameters in the IV-D group after the 7-day infusion-period (p=0.05).

Conclusions: In this small trial, IV-Dantrolene after aSAH was feasible, tolerable and safe, but was underpowered to show efficacy or outcome differences.

Comments

Abstract of poster presented at the 2014 UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science Research Retreat, held on May 20, 2014 at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Mass.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

Share

COinS
 
May 20th, 12:30 PM

Dantrolene for the Prevention and Treatment of Cerebral Vasospasm after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage – a Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial to assess Safety, Tolerability and Feasibility

Introduction: Dantrolene is neuroprotective in animal models and may attenuate cerebral vasospasm (cVSP) after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) in humans. We evaluated safety/tolerability and feasibility of intravenous dantrolene (IV-D) after aSAH.

Methods: In this single-center, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial, 31 patients with acute aSAH were randomized to IV-D 1.25 mg IV every 6 hours x 7 days (n=16) or placebo (n=15). Primary endpoint was incidence of hyponatremia (sNa ≤ 134 mmol/L) and liver toxicity (% patients with ALT, AST and AlkPhos >5x upper limit of normal). Secondary safety endpoints included tolerability, systemic hypotension and intracranial hypertension. Efficacy was explored by clinical, transcranial Doppler (TCD) or angiographic cVSP occurrence, delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and 3-month modified-Rankin-Scale, Glasgow Outcome Scale and Barthel Index. Statistical analysis was performed using non-parametric tests, generalized estimating equations and mixed models.

Results: Between IV-D vs. placebo, no differences were observed in the primary outcome (hyponatremia: 44% vs. 67% [p=0.29]; liver toxicity 6% vs. 0% [p=1.0]). Numerically more AEs and SAEs were seen in the IV-D group, but did not reach statistical significance (16 vs. 5 AEs, of which 5 vs. 2 were severe; RR 2.2; 95% CI 0.7-6.7; p=0.16). Three IV-D vs. two placebo patients reached stop criteria: one IV-D patient developed liver toxicity; two patients in each group developed brain edema requiring osmotherapy. No differences in angiographic, TCD, clinical cVSP, DCI, or 3-month functional outcomes were seen. Quantitative angiogram analysis revealed a trend towards increased vessel diameters in the IV-D group after the 7-day infusion-period (p=0.05).

Conclusions: In this small trial, IV-Dantrolene after aSAH was feasible, tolerable and safe, but was underpowered to show efficacy or outcome differences.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.