Poster Presentations

Start Date

20-5-2014 12:30 PM

Description

Mycobacterium smegmatis is a non-pathogenic microorganism and has been widely used as a model organism to study infections caused by M. tuberculosis and other mycobacterial pathogens. We report that nanoparticles conjugated with selected carbohydrate show a striking increase in the surface adherence by M. smegmatis. This applies to silica nanoparticles and magnetic nanoparticles ranging from 100 nm to 5 nm. Under the same experimental conditions, minimum adhesion was observed for unfunctionalized nanoparticles. The synthesis and characterization of the glyconanoparticles will be presented. The finding is applied to imaging M. smegmatis infected lung epithelial cells, and the results will be discussed.

Comments

Abstract of poster presented at the 2014 UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science Research Retreat, held on May 20, 2014 at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Mass.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

 
May 20th, 12:30 PM

Interactions of Carbohydrate-conjugated Nanoparticles with Mycobacterium Smegmatis

Mycobacterium smegmatis is a non-pathogenic microorganism and has been widely used as a model organism to study infections caused by M. tuberculosis and other mycobacterial pathogens. We report that nanoparticles conjugated with selected carbohydrate show a striking increase in the surface adherence by M. smegmatis. This applies to silica nanoparticles and magnetic nanoparticles ranging from 100 nm to 5 nm. Under the same experimental conditions, minimum adhesion was observed for unfunctionalized nanoparticles. The synthesis and characterization of the glyconanoparticles will be presented. The finding is applied to imaging M. smegmatis infected lung epithelial cells, and the results will be discussed.

 

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