Poster Presentations

Start Date

20-5-2014 12:30 PM

Description

Purpose: Diabetes can be a life-long disease which requires continuous blood-glucose monitoring. Currently technology, albeit good, does have its draw-backs; in particular that it is an invasive technique which causes discomfort to the individual. Therefore, low compliance can ultimately lead to other health issues. Approaches are underway to develop a portable, hand-held, noninvasive monitoring device to detect the biomarker, acetone, found in the breath of diabetics. By creating films of poly(4-vinylbenzeneboronic acid) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride), acetone can react with these via a Petasis reaction. This alters the physicochemical nature of the film, providing a quantification of acetone, and thus hopefully blood-glucose levels, in a non-invasive manner.

Methods: UV-transmitting poly(methyl methacrylate) slides are coated with a system of PAH/PVBBA at differing pH values and are then exposed to acetone/water vapor. Concentrations of acetone evaluated are 0.1–10 ppm. The slides are next subjected to the light emitted by a diode with a peak wavelength of 300 ± 5 nm. The transmitted light is detected by a UV-photosensor with an integrated transimpedance amplifier that produces a voltage output as a function of absorption.

Results: We have successfully synthesized poly(4-vinylbenzeneboronic acid) and multilayered with poly(allylamine hydrochloride). We have been able to cross-link these two polymers using only acetone vapor and are developing a hand-held device. Analyzing the difference in output voltage from exposed to unexposed slides at varying acetone concentrations, provides is a linear relationship up to 2500 ppb, which is above the high point for breath acetone concentration.

Conclusions: We have been able to develop a technology that accurately detects acetone vapor. We are engineering a hand-held breathalyzer device to detect acetone in the breath of diabetic individuals and are attempting to optimize its capabilities.

Comments

Abstract of poster presented at the 2014 UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science Research Retreat, held on May 20, 2014 at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Mass.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

 
May 20th, 12:30 PM

Point-of-Care Diabetes Monitoring via Breath Acetone Detection

Purpose: Diabetes can be a life-long disease which requires continuous blood-glucose monitoring. Currently technology, albeit good, does have its draw-backs; in particular that it is an invasive technique which causes discomfort to the individual. Therefore, low compliance can ultimately lead to other health issues. Approaches are underway to develop a portable, hand-held, noninvasive monitoring device to detect the biomarker, acetone, found in the breath of diabetics. By creating films of poly(4-vinylbenzeneboronic acid) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride), acetone can react with these via a Petasis reaction. This alters the physicochemical nature of the film, providing a quantification of acetone, and thus hopefully blood-glucose levels, in a non-invasive manner.

Methods: UV-transmitting poly(methyl methacrylate) slides are coated with a system of PAH/PVBBA at differing pH values and are then exposed to acetone/water vapor. Concentrations of acetone evaluated are 0.1–10 ppm. The slides are next subjected to the light emitted by a diode with a peak wavelength of 300 ± 5 nm. The transmitted light is detected by a UV-photosensor with an integrated transimpedance amplifier that produces a voltage output as a function of absorption.

Results: We have successfully synthesized poly(4-vinylbenzeneboronic acid) and multilayered with poly(allylamine hydrochloride). We have been able to cross-link these two polymers using only acetone vapor and are developing a hand-held device. Analyzing the difference in output voltage from exposed to unexposed slides at varying acetone concentrations, provides is a linear relationship up to 2500 ppb, which is above the high point for breath acetone concentration.

Conclusions: We have been able to develop a technology that accurately detects acetone vapor. We are engineering a hand-held breathalyzer device to detect acetone in the breath of diabetic individuals and are attempting to optimize its capabilities.

 

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