Poster Presentations

Start Date

20-5-2014 12:30 PM

Description

Background: Lack of cooking supplies may be a potential barrier to preparing healthy meals at home. We examined the availability of food preparation supplies among pregnant women in relation to sociodemographic characteristics. Methods: We used preliminary data (N=59) from an ongoing study which enrolled English-speaking women aged 18+ years, pregnant with singleton gestation <36 >weeks, pre-pregnancy BMI 18.5-40 kg/m2, and planning to deliver at UMMHC. Women completed the Food Preparation Checklist (FPC) at home. The FPC asks women if 41 specific food preparation items; scores reflect number of items present in the home. Other variables were self-reported. Pearson’s correlation, t-tests, and ANOVAs provided comparisons. We constructed an adjusted linear regression model to explore FPC by sociodemographic characteristics. Results: Women were aged 30.3 (SD=4.1) years, 64.4% were non-Hispanic White, 84.8% were married or living with a partner, and 30.5% reported difficulty paying for basic expenses. Women were enrolled at 22.7 (SD=5.6) weeks gestation; 30.5% were primigravid. Mean pre-pregnancy BMI was 25.0 (SD=4.6) kg/m2; 25.4% were overweight and 17.0% obese. Average FPC score was 32.3 (SD=6.1; range:14-39). FPC scores were higher among Non-Hispanic White women (34.6±3.5 vs. 28.1±7.5, p<0.0001), those with higher education (28.3±7.0 high school/GED or less, 31.0±6.2 some/college degree, vs. 34.7±4.6 some/degree graduate, p<0.01), those married or living with a partner (33.3±5.7 vs. 26.9±5.7, p<0.01), with lower pre-pregnancy BMI (r=-0.38, p<0.01), and who had no difficulty paying for basic expenses (34.0±5.0 vs. 28.4±6.6, p<0.001). In a model that additionally adjusted for pre-pregnancy BMI, non-Hispanic White women had on average 5.7 more food preparation items (95% CI: 3.2, 8.3) and those reporting difficulty paying for basic expenses 3.8 fewer items (95% CI: -6.8, -0.9). Conclusions: Understanding the food preparation supplies available to pregnant women may be useful when designing interventions to improve diet quality and promote healthy weight gain during pregnancy.

Comments

Abstract of poster presented at the 2014 UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science Research Retreat, held on May 20, 2014 at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Mass.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

 
May 20th, 12:30 PM

Availability of Food Preparation Supplies among Pregnant Women: Preliminary Results from the Decision Making, Eating, and Weight Gain during Pregnancy (DEW) Study

Background: Lack of cooking supplies may be a potential barrier to preparing healthy meals at home. We examined the availability of food preparation supplies among pregnant women in relation to sociodemographic characteristics. Methods: We used preliminary data (N=59) from an ongoing study which enrolled English-speaking women aged 18+ years, pregnant with singleton gestation <36>weeks, pre-pregnancy BMI 18.5-40 kg/m2, and planning to deliver at UMMHC. Women completed the Food Preparation Checklist (FPC) at home. The FPC asks women if 41 specific food preparation items; scores reflect number of items present in the home. Other variables were self-reported. Pearson’s correlation, t-tests, and ANOVAs provided comparisons. We constructed an adjusted linear regression model to explore FPC by sociodemographic characteristics. Results: Women were aged 30.3 (SD=4.1) years, 64.4% were non-Hispanic White, 84.8% were married or living with a partner, and 30.5% reported difficulty paying for basic expenses. Women were enrolled at 22.7 (SD=5.6) weeks gestation; 30.5% were primigravid. Mean pre-pregnancy BMI was 25.0 (SD=4.6) kg/m2; 25.4% were overweight and 17.0% obese. Average FPC score was 32.3 (SD=6.1; range:14-39). FPC scores were higher among Non-Hispanic White women (34.6±3.5 vs. 28.1±7.5, p<0.0001), those with higher education (28.3±7.0 high school/GED or less, 31.0±6.2 some/college degree, vs. 34.7±4.6 some/degree graduate, p<0.01), those married or living with a partner (33.3±5.7 vs. 26.9±5.7, p<0.01), with lower pre-pregnancy BMI (r=-0.38, p<0.01), and who had no difficulty paying for basic expenses (34.0±5.0 vs. 28.4±6.6, p<0.001). In a model that additionally adjusted for pre-pregnancy BMI, non-Hispanic White women had on average 5.7 more food preparation items (95% CI: 3.2, 8.3) and those reporting difficulty paying for basic expenses 3.8 fewer items (95% CI: -6.8, -0.9). Conclusions: Understanding the food preparation supplies available to pregnant women may be useful when designing interventions to improve diet quality and promote healthy weight gain during pregnancy.

 

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