Start Date

8-5-2013 3:30 PM

End Date

8-5-2013 5:00 PM

Document Type

Event

Description

This study compares two high-risk populations: foreign- and US-born adults residing in the same Boston neighborhoods noted for high violence, low income, and greater morbidity and mortality for several chronic diseases (Health of Boston, 2010). The aims of the study are to improve community engagement and to identify stress-related differences between foreign and US-born adults and the interrelations between physiological and subjective stress indices in these populations. This presentation is part of the mini-symposium titled: How Community-Academic Partnership Initiatives Can Contribute to Translational Research.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

 
May 8th, 3:30 PM May 8th, 5:00 PM

Objective and Subjective Stress Differences: Foreign-Born and U.S. Native Adults in Boston Communities

This study compares two high-risk populations: foreign- and US-born adults residing in the same Boston neighborhoods noted for high violence, low income, and greater morbidity and mortality for several chronic diseases (Health of Boston, 2010). The aims of the study are to improve community engagement and to identify stress-related differences between foreign and US-born adults and the interrelations between physiological and subjective stress indices in these populations. This presentation is part of the mini-symposium titled: How Community-Academic Partnership Initiatives Can Contribute to Translational Research.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.