Start Date

8-5-2013 1:30 PM

End Date

8-5-2013 3:00 PM

Document Type

Event

Description

The World Health Organization has estimated that 10% of the world’s population (650 million people) has a disability. Assistive Technology (AT) has the potential to improve function for individuals with disabilities. Research and development must to focus both on universal design approaches for the population, as well as customization to meet individual functional demands. This mini-symposium will present the trends driving the need for AT, case studies demonstrating solutions to functional challenges, and evidence-based policy measures that are being implemented to meet the needs of people with disabilities living in the community.

Since 1991, UMass Lowell has operated an AT Program through which individuals with disabilities and community organizations meet with teams of students and faculty to design customized solutions. Symposium participants will discuss the development of population-level measures and examine indicators linking AT device use to psychosocial well-being: ultimately informing AT policies regarding access and provision. Participants will also to discuss challenges in translation of AT research due to the diversity of users and the functional implementation of AT solutions. Ultimately, participants will recognize the complex nature of AT solutions for persons with disabilities, and provide input on a strategy for a multidisciplinary collaboration to foster a novel person-center approach to research in this area.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

 
May 8th, 1:30 PM May 8th, 3:00 PM

Assistive Technology (AT): Opportunities for Interdisciplinary Research, Education, and Service Delivery

The World Health Organization has estimated that 10% of the world’s population (650 million people) has a disability. Assistive Technology (AT) has the potential to improve function for individuals with disabilities. Research and development must to focus both on universal design approaches for the population, as well as customization to meet individual functional demands. This mini-symposium will present the trends driving the need for AT, case studies demonstrating solutions to functional challenges, and evidence-based policy measures that are being implemented to meet the needs of people with disabilities living in the community.

Since 1991, UMass Lowell has operated an AT Program through which individuals with disabilities and community organizations meet with teams of students and faculty to design customized solutions. Symposium participants will discuss the development of population-level measures and examine indicators linking AT device use to psychosocial well-being: ultimately informing AT policies regarding access and provision. Participants will also to discuss challenges in translation of AT research due to the diversity of users and the functional implementation of AT solutions. Ultimately, participants will recognize the complex nature of AT solutions for persons with disabilities, and provide input on a strategy for a multidisciplinary collaboration to foster a novel person-center approach to research in this area.

 

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