Start Date

8-5-2013 12:30 PM

End Date

8-5-2013 1:30 PM

Document Type

Event

Description

Background: Diabetic patients have more complications and higher hospital mortality rates after an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) than patients without diabetes (DM). Increased morbidity and mortality among diabetic patients suffering an AMI is especially concerning given the increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes in the U.S. and worldwide. The objectives of this study were to describe recent trends in the frequency, patient characteristics, treatment practices, and in-hospital outcomes associated with STEMI and NSTEMI in diabetic compared with non-diabetic patients hospitalized with AMI.

Methods: We reviewed the medical records of 6,903 persons, known to be either diabetic (n =2,329) or non-diabetic (n=4,574 ) who were hospitalized for STEMI or NSTEMI between 1997 and 2009 at all 11 greater Worcester medical centers.

Results: Diabetic patients presenting with both STEMI and NSTEMI were more likely to be older, female, and obese, and to have a higher prevalence of comorbidities compared with non-diabetics. Diabetic patients were more likely to develop important in-hospital complications including heart failure (39% vs.27%),and atrial fibrillation (18% vs.16%), and had a longer hospital stay (6.3 days vs.5.4 days) compared to non-diabetics. Diabetic patients were significantly more likely to be treated with an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker and a diuretic. The proportion of patients undergoing cardiac catheterization during their index hospitalization for AMI approximately doubled during the period under study, while the proportion treated with PCI increased by 3 to 4-fold. The proportion of diabetic and non-diabetic patients undergoing cardiac catheterization was similar, though diabetics were less likely to be treated with PCI and more likely to receive CABG than non-diabetics. In-hospital mortality was significantly higher among diabetics than non-diabetics for both STEMI (13% vs. 10%) and NSTEMI (11% vs. 9%)

Conclusions: During the period 1997 to 2009, the use of effective therapies for all patients presenting with AMI has improved, with a concomitant decrease in in-hospital complications and mortality . Nonetheless, diabetic patients experienced , more complications, and worse in-hospital outcomes compared to non-diabetics.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

 
May 8th, 12:30 PM May 8th, 1:30 PM

Trends in the Frequency, Patient Characteristics, Management, and in-Hospital Outcomes of Diabetic Patients Presenting with Acute Myocardial Infarction

Background: Diabetic patients have more complications and higher hospital mortality rates after an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) than patients without diabetes (DM). Increased morbidity and mortality among diabetic patients suffering an AMI is especially concerning given the increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes in the U.S. and worldwide. The objectives of this study were to describe recent trends in the frequency, patient characteristics, treatment practices, and in-hospital outcomes associated with STEMI and NSTEMI in diabetic compared with non-diabetic patients hospitalized with AMI.

Methods: We reviewed the medical records of 6,903 persons, known to be either diabetic (n =2,329) or non-diabetic (n=4,574 ) who were hospitalized for STEMI or NSTEMI between 1997 and 2009 at all 11 greater Worcester medical centers.

Results: Diabetic patients presenting with both STEMI and NSTEMI were more likely to be older, female, and obese, and to have a higher prevalence of comorbidities compared with non-diabetics. Diabetic patients were more likely to develop important in-hospital complications including heart failure (39% vs.27%),and atrial fibrillation (18% vs.16%), and had a longer hospital stay (6.3 days vs.5.4 days) compared to non-diabetics. Diabetic patients were significantly more likely to be treated with an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker and a diuretic. The proportion of patients undergoing cardiac catheterization during their index hospitalization for AMI approximately doubled during the period under study, while the proportion treated with PCI increased by 3 to 4-fold. The proportion of diabetic and non-diabetic patients undergoing cardiac catheterization was similar, though diabetics were less likely to be treated with PCI and more likely to receive CABG than non-diabetics. In-hospital mortality was significantly higher among diabetics than non-diabetics for both STEMI (13% vs. 10%) and NSTEMI (11% vs. 9%)

Conclusions: During the period 1997 to 2009, the use of effective therapies for all patients presenting with AMI has improved, with a concomitant decrease in in-hospital complications and mortality . Nonetheless, diabetic patients experienced , more complications, and worse in-hospital outcomes compared to non-diabetics.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.