Start Date

8-5-2013 12:30 PM

End Date

8-5-2013 1:30 PM

Document Type

Event

Description

Introduction. National Children’s Study (NCS) Provider Based Sampling (PBS) aims to conduct a pilot study to test cost, acceptability and feasibility of recruiting a representative sample of women/children using two recruitment strategies: through prenatal providers and hospitals.

Methods. A sampling frame consisting of all providers of prenatal and delivery care within and 10-miles outside Worcester County, 16 provider and 3 hospital locations were selected as point of entry for study recruitment. During 1st prenatal care visits or post-delivery at these locations, face-to-face contact was utilized to: a) identify study eligibility and b) assess study recruitment. Preliminary

Results. Certified Data Collectors made contact with prescreened women. Consent rates of women at prenatal provider locations were lower than the consent rates in hospital locations. On average, results have shown twice as many consents could be obtained per day at hospital locations than at provider locations.

Preliminary Conclusions. Although both strategies utilized direct rapport, the two recruitment methods were associated with different consent rates. Consideration of preliminary results may lead one to consider recruitment after childbirth for several reasons: 1) greater likelihood of having opportunity to discuss study with the woman and partner from outset; 2) opportunity to check back with undecided women easily 3) longer periods to answer questions and conduct screening and consent; 4) support of nursing staff to foster participation; 5) daily presence of NCS staff; and 6) reality of infant’s birth to spur mother to consent. Recruitment during pregnancy visits may yield lower rates; further examination may be necessary to overcome challenges such as: 1) burden of adding recruitment session to often long and anxiety-laden1st prenatal visit; 2) need to develop rapport quickly during brief time periods; 3) making contact with potential participants outside of provider office when recruitment is not completed.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

 
May 8th, 12:30 PM May 8th, 1:30 PM

A Comparison of Recruitment Strategies for a Long-Term Study at Two Maternal Stages: Effectiveness of Recruitment During Pregnancy vs. After Childbirth

Introduction. National Children’s Study (NCS) Provider Based Sampling (PBS) aims to conduct a pilot study to test cost, acceptability and feasibility of recruiting a representative sample of women/children using two recruitment strategies: through prenatal providers and hospitals.

Methods. A sampling frame consisting of all providers of prenatal and delivery care within and 10-miles outside Worcester County, 16 provider and 3 hospital locations were selected as point of entry for study recruitment. During 1st prenatal care visits or post-delivery at these locations, face-to-face contact was utilized to: a) identify study eligibility and b) assess study recruitment. Preliminary

Results. Certified Data Collectors made contact with prescreened women. Consent rates of women at prenatal provider locations were lower than the consent rates in hospital locations. On average, results have shown twice as many consents could be obtained per day at hospital locations than at provider locations.

Preliminary Conclusions. Although both strategies utilized direct rapport, the two recruitment methods were associated with different consent rates. Consideration of preliminary results may lead one to consider recruitment after childbirth for several reasons: 1) greater likelihood of having opportunity to discuss study with the woman and partner from outset; 2) opportunity to check back with undecided women easily 3) longer periods to answer questions and conduct screening and consent; 4) support of nursing staff to foster participation; 5) daily presence of NCS staff; and 6) reality of infant’s birth to spur mother to consent. Recruitment during pregnancy visits may yield lower rates; further examination may be necessary to overcome challenges such as: 1) burden of adding recruitment session to often long and anxiety-laden1st prenatal visit; 2) need to develop rapport quickly during brief time periods; 3) making contact with potential participants outside of provider office when recruitment is not completed.

 

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