Start Date

22-5-2012 4:30 PM

End Date

22-5-2012 6:00 PM

Description

Introduction: The study examined gender differences in smoking and factors associated with three stages of readiness to quit smoking (precontemplation with no quit intention in the next 6 months, contemplation with a quit intention in the next 6 months but not in the next month, and preparation with a quit intention in the next month) among Korean Americans.

Method: The study is a telephone survey with a randomly selected sample from an online telephone directory. Inclusion criteria for participation were (a) being of 18 and older, (b) identifying self as Korean, and (c) having smoked daily for at least six months prior to the interview.

Results: The sample comprised 70 women and 168 men with a 63.8% response rate from eligible respondents. Women were 3 years older on average than were men when they started smoking regularly (t = 3.5, p = 0.001). Women were more likely to smoke inside the house than were men (X2 = 16.5, p < 0.001). Compared to women in the preparation stage, women in precontemplation and contemplation stages had decreased odds of perceiving a family norm favoring quitting and increased odds of perceiving risks of quitting. Compared to men in the preparation stage, men in precontemplation and contemplation stages had decreased odds of perceiving a family norm favoring quitting and benefits of quitting. Previous quit attempts were also a significant factor for both women and men.

Conclusions: Korean American female and male smokers are similar in the aspect that they are more likely to be ready to quit when they perceive a family norm favoring quitting. However, they differ in the relationship between perceived risks and benefits of quitting and readiness to quit. These findings underscore the importance of designing gender-tailored smoking cessation interventions in addition to having culture-specific interventions with the group.

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May 22nd, 4:30 PM May 22nd, 6:00 PM

Gender-Specific Factors Associated with Readiness to Quit Smoking among Korean Americans

Introduction: The study examined gender differences in smoking and factors associated with three stages of readiness to quit smoking (precontemplation with no quit intention in the next 6 months, contemplation with a quit intention in the next 6 months but not in the next month, and preparation with a quit intention in the next month) among Korean Americans.

Method: The study is a telephone survey with a randomly selected sample from an online telephone directory. Inclusion criteria for participation were (a) being of 18 and older, (b) identifying self as Korean, and (c) having smoked daily for at least six months prior to the interview.

Results: The sample comprised 70 women and 168 men with a 63.8% response rate from eligible respondents. Women were 3 years older on average than were men when they started smoking regularly (t = 3.5, p = 0.001). Women were more likely to smoke inside the house than were men (X2 = 16.5, p < 0.001). Compared to women in the preparation stage, women in precontemplation and contemplation stages had decreased odds of perceiving a family norm favoring quitting and increased odds of perceiving risks of quitting. Compared to men in the preparation stage, men in precontemplation and contemplation stages had decreased odds of perceiving a family norm favoring quitting and benefits of quitting. Previous quit attempts were also a significant factor for both women and men.

Conclusions: Korean American female and male smokers are similar in the aspect that they are more likely to be ready to quit when they perceive a family norm favoring quitting. However, they differ in the relationship between perceived risks and benefits of quitting and readiness to quit. These findings underscore the importance of designing gender-tailored smoking cessation interventions in addition to having culture-specific interventions with the group.

 

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