Start Date

20-5-2011 1:15 PM

End Date

20-5-2011 2:45 PM

Document Type

Event

Description

Living materials respond to stresses, or forces, surrounding them. If we aim to promote the growth of healthy tissue, such as in the field of tissue engineering, or limit the growth of unwanted tissue, e.g. cancerous tumors, we must understand the stresses that these tissues experience as they grow and live. How do we measure the elastic modulus of a living material? We will discuss a novel measurement technique that we developed, called cavitation rheology, which can quantitatively measure the mechanical environment of soft tissues from sub-cellular to multi-cellular length scales at arbitrary locations. We are particularly interested in applying this technique to study processes of development, disease, and damage, such as traumatic brain injuries.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

 
May 20th, 1:15 PM May 20th, 2:45 PM

Mechanics of Living, Squishy Materials

Living materials respond to stresses, or forces, surrounding them. If we aim to promote the growth of healthy tissue, such as in the field of tissue engineering, or limit the growth of unwanted tissue, e.g. cancerous tumors, we must understand the stresses that these tissues experience as they grow and live. How do we measure the elastic modulus of a living material? We will discuss a novel measurement technique that we developed, called cavitation rheology, which can quantitatively measure the mechanical environment of soft tissues from sub-cellular to multi-cellular length scales at arbitrary locations. We are particularly interested in applying this technique to study processes of development, disease, and damage, such as traumatic brain injuries.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.