Start Date

20-5-2011 10:45 AM

End Date

20-5-2011 12:15 PM

Description

The World Health Organization reported 780,000 deaths due to malaria in 2009, mostly in children under 5 years of age residing in 106 countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America. Even though there have been impressive global strides to increase the delivery of malaria interventions such as insecticide treated bednets, rapid diagnostic tests, antimalarial drugs and indoor residual spraying - every 40 seconds a child still dies from malaria. In order to make further progress toward malaria eradication, a better understanding of the dynamic relationship between the Plasmodium parasite and its human host is required.

Since malaria has such a complex life cycle, research on malaria is often multifaceted. The research presented focused on understanding how malaria is recognized by innate immune cells that may shape adaptive immunity and combined inform malaria vaccine design strategies. In addition, the parasite genetically adapts to environmental pressures such as antimalarial drugs, further thwarting eradication efforts.

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May 20th, 10:45 AM May 20th, 12:15 PM

Lessons from the Field: Parasite DNA Drives the Innate Immune Response to Malaria (it's not just the caiparinhas)

The World Health Organization reported 780,000 deaths due to malaria in 2009, mostly in children under 5 years of age residing in 106 countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America. Even though there have been impressive global strides to increase the delivery of malaria interventions such as insecticide treated bednets, rapid diagnostic tests, antimalarial drugs and indoor residual spraying - every 40 seconds a child still dies from malaria. In order to make further progress toward malaria eradication, a better understanding of the dynamic relationship between the Plasmodium parasite and its human host is required.

Since malaria has such a complex life cycle, research on malaria is often multifaceted. The research presented focused on understanding how malaria is recognized by innate immune cells that may shape adaptive immunity and combined inform malaria vaccine design strategies. In addition, the parasite genetically adapts to environmental pressures such as antimalarial drugs, further thwarting eradication efforts.

 

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