Start Date

20-5-2011 5:00 PM

End Date

20-5-2011 7:00 PM

Document Type

Event

Description

Background

  • In May 2009, after considering short and long-term maternal/child outcomes, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) revised recommendations for gestational weight gain (GWG); however preeclampsia was dismissed due to insufficient evidence. IOM 2009
  • Since change in recommendations, epidemiologic studies have since been published that support an association between GWG adherence and hypertensive disease of pregnancy. AJOG 2009;200(2):167.e1-7
  • Numerous studies have revealed adipose tissue's ability to stimulate angiogenesis. Cardiovascular Res 2008;78(2):286-93

Objective

To evaluate preeclampsia risk by angiogenic-biomarker profile by both BMI and GWG-adherence.

Hypothesis

We hypothesized that overweight/obese (OW-OB) women and over-gainers (OG) would have altered angiogenic profiles as compared to underweight/normal-weight (U-N) women and under-/appropriate-gainers (U-AG), respectively.

Conclusions

  • Findings suggest trends that OW-OB BMI and excessive GWG associated with angiogenic biomarker profiles consistent with higher preeclampsia risk by end of gestation.
  • BMI and GWG as potentially modifiable factors merit further investigation for preeclampsia risk alteration.

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May 20th, 5:00 PM May 20th, 7:00 PM

BMI, Gestational Weight Gain and Angiogenic Biomarker Profiles for Preeclampsia Risk

Background

  • In May 2009, after considering short and long-term maternal/child outcomes, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) revised recommendations for gestational weight gain (GWG); however preeclampsia was dismissed due to insufficient evidence. IOM 2009
  • Since change in recommendations, epidemiologic studies have since been published that support an association between GWG adherence and hypertensive disease of pregnancy. AJOG 2009;200(2):167.e1-7
  • Numerous studies have revealed adipose tissue's ability to stimulate angiogenesis. Cardiovascular Res 2008;78(2):286-93

Objective

To evaluate preeclampsia risk by angiogenic-biomarker profile by both BMI and GWG-adherence.

Hypothesis

We hypothesized that overweight/obese (OW-OB) women and over-gainers (OG) would have altered angiogenic profiles as compared to underweight/normal-weight (U-N) women and under-/appropriate-gainers (U-AG), respectively.

Conclusions

  • Findings suggest trends that OW-OB BMI and excessive GWG associated with angiogenic biomarker profiles consistent with higher preeclampsia risk by end of gestation.
  • BMI and GWG as potentially modifiable factors merit further investigation for preeclampsia risk alteration.

 

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