Start Date

3-3-2017 8:00 AM

Document Type

Poster

Description

Introduction: The WoW program is a two-year training program to expand employer-based health promotion and prevention. This methodology poster describes the mixed-method program evaluation design and analysis.

Methods: Data collection instruments were designed to measure key program outputs and outcomes and pre/post-intervention comparisons. Enrollment surveys, satisfaction surveys, and wellness planning and evaluation tools and surveys were designed to capture organizational characteristics, training program quality, employer wellness program and policies, and employee health status and program interests at program initiation and 12-month follow-up for four cohorts of participating organizations. The All Payer Claims Database will be used to examine changes in healthcare utilization and expenditures. Mid-course focus groups with the program team assessed opportunities to improve training efficiency and quality. Follow-up interviews with wellness champions assessed satisfaction, sustainability and future program needs. These qualitative data are examined by main themes to describe contextual factors related to program delivery.

Results: The multi-layered evaluation approach was effective for evaluating this employer training program. The instruments gathered valuable data on employer and workforce characteristics and employee health concerns and program needs. Evaluation activities provided quality monitoring that contributed to satisfaction and effectiveness. Evaluating health impacts proved difficult due to insufficient follow up period. Evaluators had partial success with estimating possible health impacts using existing intervention research literature.

Conclusion: Using a multi-layered, mixed-method evaluation approach has many advantages for process and outcome evaluation. At least two years post-program implementation data is needed to measure health and cost outcomes for worksite wellness initiatives.

Keywords

employee health, data collection, employee satisfaction, mixed-method program, program evaluation

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

 
Mar 3rd, 8:00 AM

Program Evaluation Approaches, Successes, and Lessons Learned from the Massachusetts Working on Wellness (WoW) Program

Introduction: The WoW program is a two-year training program to expand employer-based health promotion and prevention. This methodology poster describes the mixed-method program evaluation design and analysis.

Methods: Data collection instruments were designed to measure key program outputs and outcomes and pre/post-intervention comparisons. Enrollment surveys, satisfaction surveys, and wellness planning and evaluation tools and surveys were designed to capture organizational characteristics, training program quality, employer wellness program and policies, and employee health status and program interests at program initiation and 12-month follow-up for four cohorts of participating organizations. The All Payer Claims Database will be used to examine changes in healthcare utilization and expenditures. Mid-course focus groups with the program team assessed opportunities to improve training efficiency and quality. Follow-up interviews with wellness champions assessed satisfaction, sustainability and future program needs. These qualitative data are examined by main themes to describe contextual factors related to program delivery.

Results: The multi-layered evaluation approach was effective for evaluating this employer training program. The instruments gathered valuable data on employer and workforce characteristics and employee health concerns and program needs. Evaluation activities provided quality monitoring that contributed to satisfaction and effectiveness. Evaluating health impacts proved difficult due to insufficient follow up period. Evaluators had partial success with estimating possible health impacts using existing intervention research literature.

Conclusion: Using a multi-layered, mixed-method evaluation approach has many advantages for process and outcome evaluation. At least two years post-program implementation data is needed to measure health and cost outcomes for worksite wellness initiatives.

 

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