Start Date

3-3-2017 8:00 AM

Document Type

Poster

Description

Historically individuals who experience severe and persistent mental health symptoms are identified as experiencing chronic symptoms requiring long-term treatment. Treatment of these symptoms typically produces modest results and the focus shifts from achievement of meaningful and desired goals to maintenance of the individual's 'baseline' level of functioning. This leads to a cycle of long-term placement in residential or inpatient settings with relapses resulting in higher levels of care. Individuals trapped in this cycle tend to be insulated within a system of care and with little connection to the supports and resources in the community at large and few opportunities to engage in meaningful work. Our aim has been to systematically target those symptoms which create the greatest barriers for individuals working to return to living productive and enjoyable lives after the onset of mental health symptoms. To this end, we have worked to implement time-limited, targeted, and evidence-based treatment interventions. We have implemented Dialectical Behavior Therapy, Illness Management and Recovery, Supported Education and Employment, Cognitive Restructuring for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) for Psychosis and Recovery-Oriented Cognitive therapy to help individuals decrease self-injury and suicidal ideation, manage symptoms of severe and persistent mental illness, increase access to meaningful and valued work opportunities, and address complex trauma. Utilizing CBT-based interventions for these symptoms, that are historically challenging to treat, is the best way help individuals integrate into their communities and become less reliant the mental health system.

Keywords

mental health, mental health treatment, trauma, mental illness

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

 
Mar 3rd, 8:00 AM

Overcoming challenging barriers to community engagement associated with severe and persistent mental illness using evidence-based treatment interventions

Historically individuals who experience severe and persistent mental health symptoms are identified as experiencing chronic symptoms requiring long-term treatment. Treatment of these symptoms typically produces modest results and the focus shifts from achievement of meaningful and desired goals to maintenance of the individual's 'baseline' level of functioning. This leads to a cycle of long-term placement in residential or inpatient settings with relapses resulting in higher levels of care. Individuals trapped in this cycle tend to be insulated within a system of care and with little connection to the supports and resources in the community at large and few opportunities to engage in meaningful work. Our aim has been to systematically target those symptoms which create the greatest barriers for individuals working to return to living productive and enjoyable lives after the onset of mental health symptoms. To this end, we have worked to implement time-limited, targeted, and evidence-based treatment interventions. We have implemented Dialectical Behavior Therapy, Illness Management and Recovery, Supported Education and Employment, Cognitive Restructuring for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) for Psychosis and Recovery-Oriented Cognitive therapy to help individuals decrease self-injury and suicidal ideation, manage symptoms of severe and persistent mental illness, increase access to meaningful and valued work opportunities, and address complex trauma. Utilizing CBT-based interventions for these symptoms, that are historically challenging to treat, is the best way help individuals integrate into their communities and become less reliant the mental health system.

 

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