Start Date

3-3-2017 8:00 AM

Document Type

Poster

Description

Introduction: Clinical research to develop treatment for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is focusing on a nutritional regimen restricting certain carbohydrates while incorporating the use of an optimal diet that includes pre- and probiotic foods. Current assessments are not able to measure elements of this nutritional regimen, thus we developed a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). This FFQ will be utilized in a prospective study of IBD patients following an anti-inflammatory diet (IBD-AID) developed by us and used clinically at UMASS. We will track the bacterial communities inhabiting the microbiome of patients to determine diet-dependent changes, and their relation with patient wellbeing.

Objectives: 1) Develop an FFQ capable of identifying dietary components important to IBD: prebiotics, probiotics, beneficial nutrient intake, and avoidance of certain foods. 2) Determine diet-dependent changes of the gut microbiome.

Hypothesis: This study will show the microbiome of patients adopting the IBD-AID converge to one or more healthy 'enterotype' signatures, as compared to a non-IBD-AID control group.

Experimental design: Patients record daily FFQ. Foods and food groups (270) are categorized and grouped according to criteria of interest. Each food has a referent by which the patient can compare their own consumption. A scoring system satisfying dietary guidelines and components of the IBD-AID will be utilized. Twice per week patients collect stool samples for microbiome analysis. Microbiome composition and ecological metrics are compared to identify components influenced by the IBD-AID, and to separate bacterial 'enterotype' signatures of patients before, during and after diet intervention. We are currently recruiting patients.

Keywords

IBD, inflammatory bowel disease, diet, Anti-inflammatory Diet for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD-AID)

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

 
Mar 3rd, 8:00 AM

Assessment of Diet in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Collaboration of Behavioral and Basic Scientists

Introduction: Clinical research to develop treatment for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is focusing on a nutritional regimen restricting certain carbohydrates while incorporating the use of an optimal diet that includes pre- and probiotic foods. Current assessments are not able to measure elements of this nutritional regimen, thus we developed a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). This FFQ will be utilized in a prospective study of IBD patients following an anti-inflammatory diet (IBD-AID) developed by us and used clinically at UMASS. We will track the bacterial communities inhabiting the microbiome of patients to determine diet-dependent changes, and their relation with patient wellbeing.

Objectives: 1) Develop an FFQ capable of identifying dietary components important to IBD: prebiotics, probiotics, beneficial nutrient intake, and avoidance of certain foods. 2) Determine diet-dependent changes of the gut microbiome.

Hypothesis: This study will show the microbiome of patients adopting the IBD-AID converge to one or more healthy 'enterotype' signatures, as compared to a non-IBD-AID control group.

Experimental design: Patients record daily FFQ. Foods and food groups (270) are categorized and grouped according to criteria of interest. Each food has a referent by which the patient can compare their own consumption. A scoring system satisfying dietary guidelines and components of the IBD-AID will be utilized. Twice per week patients collect stool samples for microbiome analysis. Microbiome composition and ecological metrics are compared to identify components influenced by the IBD-AID, and to separate bacterial 'enterotype' signatures of patients before, during and after diet intervention. We are currently recruiting patients.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.