Start Date

3-3-2017 8:00 AM

Document Type

Poster

Description

Background: Community Engaged Research (CEnR) as a means to address health disparities has emphasized the necessity for community members to partner with researchers. The Boston University CTSI identified the local need to increase the number and diversity of community members ready and willing to engage in the research process.

Methods: Connecting Community to Research (CCR) was designed to train community groups interested in improving the health of their community. Trainings were adapted from existing curricula with input from a 12 member advisory panel. The goal was to help trainees understand the various roles they can play along the research process. In a 1-2 hour training, participants were guided through an introduction to CEnR and learned how sharing their stories could inform research. The training concluded with an evaluation survey and opportunities to get connected to loco-regional projects.

Results: From December 2015 to November 2016, 100 participants of diverse backgrounds were trained at 7 sessions: 56% identified as White, 35% African American, and 6% other races. Evaluation data indicated: 94% of trainees understood how research could address a community concern, 82% understood how to use their stories to inform research, and 53% intended to participate as an advocate in research.

Conclusion: These data suggest trainings like CCR can increase the number and diversity of community members willing to engage in research. While this introductory training generated positive results, additional trainings with varying levels of skill development may be needed to further empower community members to engage as partners in research.

Keywords

Community Engaged Research, training, community groups

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

 
Mar 3rd, 8:00 AM

Connecting Community to Research: A Training Program to Increase Community Partnerships in Research

Background: Community Engaged Research (CEnR) as a means to address health disparities has emphasized the necessity for community members to partner with researchers. The Boston University CTSI identified the local need to increase the number and diversity of community members ready and willing to engage in the research process.

Methods: Connecting Community to Research (CCR) was designed to train community groups interested in improving the health of their community. Trainings were adapted from existing curricula with input from a 12 member advisory panel. The goal was to help trainees understand the various roles they can play along the research process. In a 1-2 hour training, participants were guided through an introduction to CEnR and learned how sharing their stories could inform research. The training concluded with an evaluation survey and opportunities to get connected to loco-regional projects.

Results: From December 2015 to November 2016, 100 participants of diverse backgrounds were trained at 7 sessions: 56% identified as White, 35% African American, and 6% other races. Evaluation data indicated: 94% of trainees understood how research could address a community concern, 82% understood how to use their stories to inform research, and 53% intended to participate as an advocate in research.

Conclusion: These data suggest trainings like CCR can increase the number and diversity of community members willing to engage in research. While this introductory training generated positive results, additional trainings with varying levels of skill development may be needed to further empower community members to engage as partners in research.

 

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