Start Date

25-3-2016 8:00 AM

Document Type

Event

Description

Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) engage in less physical activity (PA), and in one estimate (Curtin et al., 2010) were 1.3 times more likely to be obese than their typically developing (TD) peers. Barriers to PA in children with ASD exist at the individual, family/peer and community levels of the socio-ecological model. Research on multilevel adaptations to PA programs has been promising. With adapted coaching, adolescents with ASD have achieved fitness gains equal to those seen in TD children, and have performed high levels of moderate-intensity PA in community settings. Social skills development has also been noted. Community-engaged research is well suited to identifying barriers to PA and designing programs and lifestyle approaches to health. It may be particularly useful for research with children with ASD and their families from culturally diverse communities. Scant research has been conducted on PA in ASD, but it is almost non-existent among Chinese-American children/families, for whom familial and cultural perspectives on ASD, modes of exercise and health, and other factors may diverge from the typical American norm. This poster will: (1) review research on multi-level determinants of PA and exercise, and on programs for children with ASD in general; (2) review research on community-engaged approaches for addressing PA and related health challenges in ASD; (3) describe Chinese-American cultural variables that may influence participation in PA in families with children with ASD; and (4) propose ideas for new community-engaged research and sustainable partnerships that would address these challenges among Chinese-American children and families.

Keywords

physical activity, autism spectrum disorder, Chinese-American children, community-engaged research

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

 
Mar 25th, 8:00 AM

Status and Potential of Community-Engaged Research to Investigate Physical Activity Interventions for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Chinese-American Communities

Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) engage in less physical activity (PA), and in one estimate (Curtin et al., 2010) were 1.3 times more likely to be obese than their typically developing (TD) peers. Barriers to PA in children with ASD exist at the individual, family/peer and community levels of the socio-ecological model. Research on multilevel adaptations to PA programs has been promising. With adapted coaching, adolescents with ASD have achieved fitness gains equal to those seen in TD children, and have performed high levels of moderate-intensity PA in community settings. Social skills development has also been noted. Community-engaged research is well suited to identifying barriers to PA and designing programs and lifestyle approaches to health. It may be particularly useful for research with children with ASD and their families from culturally diverse communities. Scant research has been conducted on PA in ASD, but it is almost non-existent among Chinese-American children/families, for whom familial and cultural perspectives on ASD, modes of exercise and health, and other factors may diverge from the typical American norm. This poster will: (1) review research on multi-level determinants of PA and exercise, and on programs for children with ASD in general; (2) review research on community-engaged approaches for addressing PA and related health challenges in ASD; (3) describe Chinese-American cultural variables that may influence participation in PA in families with children with ASD; and (4) propose ideas for new community-engaged research and sustainable partnerships that would address these challenges among Chinese-American children and families.

 

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