Start Date

8-11-2013 8:30 AM

End Date

8-11-2013 10:00 AM

Document Type

Event

Description

Recent advances in mobile computing and body sensing technologies have enabled new ways to practice medicine and promote public health using mobile devices such as smart phones and tablets. These applications include the use of mobile devices in collecting community and clinical health data, delivery of healthcare information, real-time monitoring of patient vital signs, and direct provision of care (via mobile telemedicine). In this poster we will describe a recent experience in partnering for community engaged research in Peru. The partnership seeks to promote maternal and child health via mobile health applications in two study sites. The first site is located in Carabayllo, a town located in the outskirts of the metropolitan area of Lima, the capital of Peru. The second site includes two rural communities in Huancavelica, a region located in the Central Andean region. On both sites, researchers at UMASS Lowell have established partnerships with local researchers and practitioners and are using Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) principles in the processes of establishing the partnership and defining the project goals, methodologies and implementation activities.

The poster places emphasis on the technological and human systems interactions that should be considered when developing mobile applications to address health disparities in general, and maternal and child health in particular. The challenge of this community-based effort lies in the integration of mobile technology into the current socio-technical system in both study sites. Our interdisciplinary research team includes faculty and students from Computer Science, Engineering, Medicine, Public Health, and Obstetrics (OB-GYN). The team is aware that in order to ensure populations can and will use our new technologies, we need to first understand the social and cultural barriers to technology adoption broadly, and to the health devices and applications specifically. Throughout the phases of the project we plan to incorporate a human factors engineering approach –focusing on the individual capabilities and limitations (e.g. health professional and patient)–together with a culturally relevant approach to technology design. The need to become knowledgeable and respectful of the communities’ cultural attributes, beliefs and practices is also discussed.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

 
Nov 8th, 8:30 AM Nov 8th, 10:00 AM

Reaching the “Hard-to-Reach” with Mobile Health Applications in Perú

Recent advances in mobile computing and body sensing technologies have enabled new ways to practice medicine and promote public health using mobile devices such as smart phones and tablets. These applications include the use of mobile devices in collecting community and clinical health data, delivery of healthcare information, real-time monitoring of patient vital signs, and direct provision of care (via mobile telemedicine). In this poster we will describe a recent experience in partnering for community engaged research in Peru. The partnership seeks to promote maternal and child health via mobile health applications in two study sites. The first site is located in Carabayllo, a town located in the outskirts of the metropolitan area of Lima, the capital of Peru. The second site includes two rural communities in Huancavelica, a region located in the Central Andean region. On both sites, researchers at UMASS Lowell have established partnerships with local researchers and practitioners and are using Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) principles in the processes of establishing the partnership and defining the project goals, methodologies and implementation activities.

The poster places emphasis on the technological and human systems interactions that should be considered when developing mobile applications to address health disparities in general, and maternal and child health in particular. The challenge of this community-based effort lies in the integration of mobile technology into the current socio-technical system in both study sites. Our interdisciplinary research team includes faculty and students from Computer Science, Engineering, Medicine, Public Health, and Obstetrics (OB-GYN). The team is aware that in order to ensure populations can and will use our new technologies, we need to first understand the social and cultural barriers to technology adoption broadly, and to the health devices and applications specifically. Throughout the phases of the project we plan to incorporate a human factors engineering approach –focusing on the individual capabilities and limitations (e.g. health professional and patient)–together with a culturally relevant approach to technology design. The need to become knowledgeable and respectful of the communities’ cultural attributes, beliefs and practices is also discussed.

 

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