Start Date

30-11-2012 8:30 AM

End Date

30-11-2012 10:00 AM

Document Type

Event

Description

The Institute of Medicine (2007) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) (2010) recognized that the school environment plays a role in shaping children’s health and health behaviors, and school health services are positioned to model these approaches. The majority of school health services are school nurse (SN) managed (RWJF, 2012; Schainker, 2005), but a research gap exists linking school health services with improved student outcomes (Hootman, 2002; Lear, 2007). In Massachusetts, the student health research question ideally has roots in the expertise of the SN. The researcher conducting a school-based student health study interacts with SNs and administrators in school districts that vary by the type and number of health staff , as well as district location and size. These variables confound the research design in terms of structure and process. IRB issues and permission for research conduction in the school district are particularly vexing. Consent of parents and assent of children are required, and SNs participating in the research must complete human subjects training. Massachusetts School Nurse Research Network (MASNRN) was founded in 2004 by a group of SN experts to conduct school based research. The 100 members of MASNRN have conducted studies across the state and within school districts on asthma, availability of epinephrine for anaphylaxis, bullying, immunizations, training modules and mental health. Particular lessons learned from the unique experience of conducting research in schools are presented.

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Nov 30th, 8:30 AM Nov 30th, 10:00 AM

Lessons Learned in Conducting School Health Research in Massachusetts: A Massachusetts School Nurse Research Network (MASNRN) Project

The Institute of Medicine (2007) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) (2010) recognized that the school environment plays a role in shaping children’s health and health behaviors, and school health services are positioned to model these approaches. The majority of school health services are school nurse (SN) managed (RWJF, 2012; Schainker, 2005), but a research gap exists linking school health services with improved student outcomes (Hootman, 2002; Lear, 2007). In Massachusetts, the student health research question ideally has roots in the expertise of the SN. The researcher conducting a school-based student health study interacts with SNs and administrators in school districts that vary by the type and number of health staff , as well as district location and size. These variables confound the research design in terms of structure and process. IRB issues and permission for research conduction in the school district are particularly vexing. Consent of parents and assent of children are required, and SNs participating in the research must complete human subjects training. Massachusetts School Nurse Research Network (MASNRN) was founded in 2004 by a group of SN experts to conduct school based research. The 100 members of MASNRN have conducted studies across the state and within school districts on asthma, availability of epinephrine for anaphylaxis, bullying, immunizations, training modules and mental health. Particular lessons learned from the unique experience of conducting research in schools are presented.

 

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