Relationship between leisure-time physical activity and selected dietary variables in the Worcester Area Trial for Counseling in Hyperlipidemia

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine; Department of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine



Document Type



Chronic Disease; Cross-Sectional Studies; *Diet; Epidemiologic Studies; *Exercise; Female; *Health Behavior; Humans; Hyperlipidemias; *Leisure Activities; *Life Style; Male; Middle Aged; Nutritional Status


Cardiology | Cardiovascular Diseases


We evaluated the relationship between Leisure-time Physical Activity (LTPA) and selected dietary variables in the Worcester Area Trial for Counseling in Hyperlipidemia. Subjects were males (N = 425) and females (N = 494) of mean age 49.8 and 48.4 yr, respectively. Dietary data were collected using a 7-d (7DDR) and a 24-h dietary recall (24HR), and LTPA information was obtained along with the 7DDR. Subjects were categorized into four levels of LTPA (0-29 (N = 548), 30-60 (N = 98), 61-120 (N = 137), and > or = 121 min.wk-1 (N = 136)). Results from ANOVA revealed that active subjects (LTPA > or = 30 min.wk-1) consumed fewer servings per week of meats, fried foods, sweets, and 2-4% milk and more servings of fruits, vegetables, low fat dairy products, and 0-1% milk than did inactive subjects (LTPA = 0-29 min.wk-1). Comparison of selected 7DDR-derived macro- and micronutrients revealed that active individuals consumed a lower fat and a more micronutrient dense diet than their more inactive counterparts. These findings were not materially altered by adjustment for age, gender, education, and smoking. Finally, the 7DDR results were confirmed in analyses of the 24HR data in a slightly smaller group of subjects (N = 756). The present findings have implications for etiologic investigations on outcomes that have both LTPA and diet as risk factors, and for targeting public health interventions.

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Citation: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1997 Sep;29(9):1199-207.

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